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i try to block the jq click() when you click on an link in a div.

HTML

<div id="all">
    <div id="test">
        <a href="http://google.de">google</a>
    </div>
</div>

JS

$('#test').click(function() { alert('only when i click the div');  });

$('a').click(function(e) {
    e.stopPropagation();
    e.preventDefault();
    $('body').append(e.target.href);
});       

This code works great but my content is dynamically so i need a delegate() solution.

The code below dont work. But why? Whats the problem?

$('#all').delegate("a", "click", function(e)
{
    e.stopPropagation();
    e.preventDefault();
    $('body').append(e.target.href);
});

example
http://jsfiddle.net/Lf3hL/13/

share|improve this question
    
"dont work" isn't a very accurate description of a problem... –  Andy E Oct 13 '11 at 8:45
    
possible duplicate of Stop propagation with jquery delegate/live function not working –  Felix Kling Oct 13 '11 at 8:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

stopPropagation doesn't work with delegate - http://api.jquery.com/event.stopPropagation/

Since the .live() method handles events once they have propagated to the top of the document, it is not possible to stop propagation of live events. Similarly, events handled by .delegate() will propagate to the elements to which they are delegated; event handlers bound on any elements below it in the DOM tree will already have been executed by the time the delegated event handler is called. These handlers, therefore, may prevent the delegated handler from triggering by calling event.stopPropagation() or returning false.

Now if you change your test click to use a delegate and use stopImmediatePropagation it will work

$('#all').delegate('#test', 'click' ,function() {
    alert('only when i click on the div');
});    

$('#all').delegate("a", "click", function(e)
{
    e.stopImmediatePropagation();
    e.preventDefault();
    $('body').append(e.target.href);
}); 

http://jsfiddle.net/Lf3hL/14/

share|improve this answer

Because delegate() works by letting events bubble up, then handling them on the ancestor element (#all in your example).

So, because the events have already bubbled up, you can't stop them propagating at their source (because they must propagate to work).

share|improve this answer

From the jQuery .delegate() doc:

Since the .live() method handles events once they have propagated to the top of the document, it is not possible to stop propagation of live events. Similarly, events handled by .delegate() will propagate to the elements to which they are delegated; event handlers bound on any elements below it in the DOM tree will already have been executed by the time the delegated event handler is called.

One possible solution is not attaching the event handler on the a, but on #test instead, and checking the event.target.

I've updated your Fiddle with this method.

   $('#test').click(function(e) {
        if ($(e.target).is('a')) {
            alert('link was clicked');
        }
        else {
            alert('only when i click on the div');
        }

        e.preventDefault(); //just to cancel the link's default action
    });
share|improve this answer

The live and delegate functions are not able to handle the e.stopPropagation(); call in the same way 'normal' events would. From the delegate docs -

Since the .live() method handles events once they have propagated to the top of the document, it is not possible to stop propagation of live events. Similarly, events handled by .delegate() will propagate to the elements to which they are delegated; event handlers bound on any elements below it in the DOM tree will already have been executed by the time the delegated event handler is called. These handlers, therefore, may prevent the delegated handler from triggering by calling event.stopPropagation() or returning false.

share|improve this answer

why not use the

.live()

function?

 $('a').live('click', function() {
     // Live handler called.
 });

that would add a click function to all the tags that are added after the body is fully loaded.

share|improve this answer
2  
live() and delegate() are essentially the same, with a few subtle differences on how they're handled internally. –  Andy E Oct 13 '11 at 8:43

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