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I am wondering if this is possible in Perl without a for loop.

I have an array filled with numbers ranging from 1 to 7 (could be repeating).

I am sorting the array first. Then I get the lowest element.

What I need is, if the value of the first element is 1, then I want to check if the array contains (2,3,4,5).

Can I do this in one line, without a loop?

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2  
What happens if the first element is not 1? Why do you want to avoid a loop? –  musiKk Oct 13 '11 at 8:56
1  
Am new to this, but was thinking... could you maybe print the @arr to a $string then maybe regex on that to find the pattern... –  Carpenter Oct 13 '11 at 10:39
2  
@Carpenter is right if the array contain ONLY NUMBERS BETWEEN 1 and 7. You can do something like: print "has 2,3,4,5" if join('', @arr) =~ m/2+3+4+5+/xmsi; –  Dimitar Petrov Oct 13 '11 at 10:54
2  
@KarthikKrishnan => you still have not explained why you do not want a loop? –  Eric Strom Oct 13 '11 at 20:13
1  
@KarthikKrishnan => any time that you think a loop will be too time consuming, consider how the other solutions will be implemented behind the scenes. Chances are that the other solution is just a loop hidden behind a subroutine call or two. The simple fact of the matter is that if you have n elements, and you are only scanning the list once, you are not going to get better than O(n) performance. Multiple scans might offer room for optimization. –  Eric Strom Oct 14 '11 at 16:33

2 Answers 2

I don't understand why you sort array first but for checking of existence of some values in array you can use for example this approach:

sub check2345 {
  my %h;
  @h{@_}=();
  return 4 == grep exists $h{$_}, 2 .. 5;
}

if you rely on one line (expression):

do{my%h;@h{@array}=();4==grep exists$h{$_},2..5}
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You can do this in one line by using a grep/keys/map construct:

#!perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

my @arr = ( 1, 2, 4, 5 );
say "has 2, 3, 4, 5" if 4 == grep { $_ == 2 || $_ == 3 || $_ == 4 || $_ == 5 } keys %{{ map { $_ => 1 } @arr }};

If your elements are going to be integers, you can shorten the grep to:

grep { $_ >= 2 && $_ <= 5 }

If you want to make things a little more supportable (i.e. if your end bounds might be changing), you could try:

#!perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

my @arr = ( 1, 2, 4, 5 );
my $first = 2;
my $last = 5;
say "has them all" if ($last-$first+1) == grep { $_ >= $first && $_ <= $last } keys %{{ map { $_ => 1 } @arr }};

(Note that in both of my examples the script should print nothing, since the array doesn't have all of the elements (2, 3, 4, 5)).

Edit: Based on Hynek's comment below, I've removed the useless use of map and allowed for duplicate values in the original array.

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You map usage is useless and both your solutions don't solve duplicates which are explicitly stated in question. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Oct 13 '11 at 22:35
    
@Hynek-Pichi-Vychodil: I've edited my post to reflect your comments. –  CanSpice Oct 13 '11 at 22:51

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