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I want to be able to pass one object to another, then set up events that execute different methods from the initial object.

var TEST = {}; 
//User-created object
TEST.testObj = function () { this.initialize.apply(this, arguments); };
TEST.testObj.prototype = {
    initialize: function(a) {   
        this.a = a;
    },
    sayHi: function() {
    alert(a);
}
} 
//Menu accosiated with that class of objects 
TEST.testMenu = function () { this.initialize.apply(this, arguments); };
TEST.testMenu.prototype = {
    initialize: function(obj) {
        this.obj = obj;
        var menuItem = document.createElement('div');
        menuItem.innerHTML = 'Say Hi!';
        menuItem.onclick = this.obj.sayHi;
        document.body.appendChild(menuItem);
    }
}

t1 = new TEST.testObj('Test Object');
menu = new TEST.testMenu(t1);

Activating the event by clicking the div alerts undefined. It looks like it's calling the function sayHi, but a generic one not associated with an instantiated object.

Thanks!

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Please use a short, descriptive title... –  Felix Kling Oct 13 '11 at 9:00
    
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't have a sayHi() function declared in this code. Just add this line

TEST.testObj.prototype.sayHi = function() {alert('hi')}

after the TEST.testObj.prototype... part. This will create a new function in TEST's prototype chain that you can call inside the testMenu object

EDIT The way you are binding the onclick event, this was referring to the div HTML element, not the object. This is the changed code that should work:

var TEST = {}; 
        //User-created object
        TEST.testObj = function () { this.initialize.apply(this, arguments); };
        TEST.testObj.prototype = {
            a: null, 
            initialize: function(a) {
                this.a = a;
            },
            sayHi: function() {
            alert(this.a);
        }
        } 
        //Menu accosiated with that class of objects 
        TEST.testMenu = function () { this.initialize.apply(this, arguments); };
        TEST.testMenu.prototype = {
            initialize: function(obj) {
                this.obj = obj;
                var menuItem = document.createElement('div');
                menuItem.innerHTML = 'Say Hi!';
                menuItem.onclick = function() { obj.sayHi(); }
                document.body.appendChild(menuItem);
            }
        }

        t1 = new TEST.testObj('Test Object');
        menu = new TEST.testMenu(t1);
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, my bad I just noticed that I mess up when I copy and pasted it. Edited to include the function. Thing is, I want to alert a property of the testObj object. It's coming up undefined. Thanks. –  Brian A Blackwell Oct 13 '11 at 9:11
    
OK, I edited my answer. The problem was essentially in the onclick binding event. Another issue was that you were referring to the a variable, which is undefined, instead of this.a –  Nikoloff Oct 13 '11 at 9:22
    
Perfect, thanks. I thought I had a pretty good handle on this, I'll have to read up on it more. –  Brian A Blackwell Oct 13 '11 at 9:31
    
Yeah this is kinda not-so-easy-to-understand. This is why kids this days can't live without jQuery and stuff. Not that jQuery is a bad thing, not at all. Just a little more understanding of javascript in general would've been a nice thing to have around. Good luck :) –  Nikoloff Oct 13 '11 at 9:39
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