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I have a dynamically formed string like - part1.abc.part2.abc.part3.abc

In this string I want to know position of second to last "." so that i can split string as part1.abc.part2.abc and part3.abc

let me know is there any direct method available to get this?

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it is unclear as to what you want. do you want to split a.b.c to a, b, c? –  Deeptechtons Oct 13 '11 at 9:17
1  
You can get an array of strings when you split on a ('.'), the last 2 words from the array are "part3" and "abc". Play around with this –  Rob Oct 13 '11 at 9:17
    
Splitting many string (just to get the last two) might be a memory/performance issue, lots of useless string will be created. –  bitbonk Oct 13 '11 at 9:42

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted
string str = "part1.abc.part2.abc.part3.abc";
int ix1 = str.LastIndexOf('.');
int ix2 = ix1 > 0 ? str.LastIndexOf('.', ix1 - 1) : -1;

There are always lovers of Regexes (and jQuery), so I'll give a Regex solution (for the jQuery solution you'll have to wait :-) ):

var match = Regex.Match(str, @"\.[^\.]*\.", RegexOptions.RightToLeft);
int ix = match.Success ? match.Index : -1;

(note that I'm an hater of Regexes, I'm giving it to you so that you can have enough rope to hang yourself if you so choose).

Be aware that I'm using the RegexOptions.RightToLeft option so that the Regex starts at the last character.

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You can use the String.LastIndexOf('.') method to get the position of the last full-stop/period, then use that position in a second call to LastIndexOf('.') to get the last but one, e.g.:

string aString = "part1.abc.part2.abc.part3.abc";
int lastPos = aString.LastIndexOf('.');

int lastPosButOne = aString.LastIndexOf('.', 0, lastPos - 1);



But I'd recommend using String.Split('.') which will give you an array of the string parts, then you can take the last but one, e.g.

string aString = "part1.abc.part2.abc.part3.abc";
string[] parts = aString.Split('.');

string lastPartButOne = parts[parts.Length - 1];
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You can use String.Split() method, which returns an array of the splitted items. You can then concatenate the first 2 and leave the last one.

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What about "part1.abc.part2.abc.part3.abc".Split('.') in this case you will get an Array of all the substrings

Hope this helps.

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Try string class LastIndexOf method.

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As far as I know there is no out-of-the-box solution. One approach would be to find the last "." with string's LastIndexOf, and then search for the last point again, this time using the overload that lets you specify the startindex and count, using the index of the first call as parameter to count.

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LastIndexOf should do what you want. Just do it twice.

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This would be the solution, with the best possible performance (it probably won't get much faster and memory lightweight than this, unless you want to go the unsafe route):

public static int LastIndexOf(this string str, char charToSearch, int repeatCound)
{
    int index = -1;
    for(int i = str.Length - 1; i >= 0, numfound < repeatCound)
    {
        if(str[i] == charToSearch)
        {
            index = i; 
            numfound++;
        }
    }

    return index;
}
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Based on @bitbonk's answer. I used below code which is a replica of RAT() function of VFP.

    public static int RightIndexAt(this string expressionToSearch, char charToSearch, int occurence)
    {
        //Validate parameter
        if (occurence < 1)
            return -1;

        int index = -1;
        int numfound = 0;

        for (int count = expressionToSearch.Length - 1; count >= 0; count--)
        {
            if (expressionToSearch[count].Equals(charToSearch))
            {
                index = count;
                numfound++;
            }

            if (numfound.Equals(occurence))
                break;
        }

        return numfound < occurence ? -1 : index;
    }
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