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I use this to get the date:

var currentTime = new Date()
var month = currentTime.getMonth() + 1
var day = currentTime.getDate()
var year = currentTime.getFullYear()
alert(month + "/" + day + "/" + year);

How can I add 2 weeks ? So instead of showing 10/13/2011, to show 10/27/2011 etc

Here is the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/25wNa/

I want the one input to have +14 days and the other +21

Note: I'd like the format to be > 10/13/2011 <.

Thanks

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Please, use the ISO date format: YYYY-MM-DD xkcd.com/1179 –  Artur Czajka May 6 '13 at 13:52

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

12096e5 is a magic number which is 14 days in milliseconds.

var fortnightAway = new Date(+new Date + 12096e5);

jsFiddle.

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It goes to 15th of october? –  jQuerybeast Oct 13 '11 at 9:25
    
@jQuerybeast: It doesn't for me. –  alex Oct 13 '11 at 9:31
    
Ah my mistake. I want it on my format that's why I asked the question. Can you check my fiddle and the edit? Thanks –  jQuerybeast Oct 13 '11 at 9:32
    
@jQuerybeast Simply use your existing code, but replace currentTime with fortnightAway. –  alex Oct 13 '11 at 9:51
1  
@jQuerybeast: 1000 * 60 * 60 * 24 * 14, milliseconds in one second * seconds in a minute * minutes in an hour * hours in a day * days in 2 weeks. –  alex Oct 13 '11 at 10:22
var currentTime = new Date();
currentTime.setDate(currentTime.getDate()+14);
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Can you please check my edit? Id like it in a format of DD/MM/YY. That's why I asked my question because if I add on that format it bypasses the maximum days of a month. I get a value of 34/10/2011. Thanks –  jQuerybeast Oct 13 '11 at 9:56
    
Just put currentTime.setDate(currentTime.getDate()+14); before you defining separate day, month and year variables in your function. It should works. –  Yuri Oct 13 '11 at 10:07

Well, JS times are in millisecond, so adding two weeks would be a case of working out what two weeks is in milliseconds, and adding that value.

var twoWeeks = 1000 * 60 * 60 * 24 * 14;
var twoWeeksTime = new Date(new Date().getTime() + twoWeeks);
var formattedDate = twoWeeksTime.getDate() + '/' + (twoWeeksTime.getMonth()+1) + '/' + twoWeeksTime.getYear();

Of course, this method falls down if you need to add months, since they're variable in length, but it's fine for adding days and weeks.

Alternatively, you use the DateJS library, which has functionality for exactly this kind of thing (plus loads more).

With DateJS, your code could look like this:

var twoWeeksTime = Date.today().add({ days: 14 });
var formattedDate = twoWeeks.TimetoString('dd/MM/yy');

Hope that helps.

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I think var twoWeeks = 1000* 60 * 60 * 24 * 14; –  Narendra Yadala Oct 13 '11 at 9:30
    
@Narendra - heh, yeah, typo. thanks. fixed. –  Spudley Oct 13 '11 at 9:32
    
Can you please check my edit? Id like it in a format of DD/MM/YY. That's why I asked my question because if I add on that format it bypasses the maximum days of a month. I get a value of 34/10/2011. Thanks –  jQuerybeast Oct 13 '11 at 9:36
    
@jQuerybeast - using the technique from your the question with the twoWeeksTime variable in my answer will give you a valid date. Have you tried it? But anyway, I've added a formatting line of code to my answer, plus a bit of code to demo how the DateJS makes things easier. –  Spudley Oct 13 '11 at 9:49
    
There is no way I will be using an entire plugin for a date... –  jQuerybeast Oct 13 '11 at 9:51

add the following prototype method

Date.prototype.addDays = function(days) {
     this.setDate(this.getDate()+days);
}

and than its very simple to use,

currentTime.addDays(5);
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have made a fidle for you http://jsfiddle.net/pramodpv/wfwuZ/

    Date.prototype.AddDays = function(noOfDays) {
       this.setTime(this.getTime() + (noOfDays * (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24)));
       return this;
    }

    Date.prototype.toString = function() {
       return this.getMonth() + "/" + this.getDate() + "/" +  this.getFullYear().toString().slice(2); 
    }

    $(function() {
        var currentTime = new Date();
        alert(currentTime.AddDays(14));
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Can you please check my edit? Id like it in a format of DD/MM/YY. That's why I asked my question because if I add on that format it bypasses the maximum days of a month. I get a value of 34/10/2011. Thanks –  jQuerybeast Oct 13 '11 at 9:55
    
if you are using the DD/MM/YY throughout you can override the dates toString function. i have edited my answer and fiddle as per your date format. js fiddle link is jsfiddle.net/pramodpv/wfwuZ/2 –  Pramod SyneITY Oct 14 '11 at 1:29
    
I liked the AddDays function, however it does not handle dst switches if you want that: So, I made it more like this: function addDays(noOfDays, date) { var origTimezoneOffset = date.getTimezoneOffset(); date = new Date(date.getTime() + (noOfDays * (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24))); var offsetDiff = (date.getTimezoneOffset() - origTimezoneOffset) * 60 * 1000; date = new Date(date.getTime() + offsetDiff); return date; } –  Justin Pihony Aug 28 at 16:20

Try this:

currentTime.setDate(currentTime.getDate()+14);
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If you are formatting a javascript date in a particular format, then I think you can have a look at this script http://blog.stevenlevithan.com/archives/date-time-format. All you would need to do after including the script is this new Date(+new Date + 1000* 60 * 60 * 24 * 14).format('dd/mm/yyyy') and you would get the output "27/10/2011"

The script is pretty small, just above 1KB minified. This is the link to a working fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/naryad/GufvT/

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