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I need urgent help with a tiny issue, I know that someone have a simple answer to that question. I'm a JAVA user but i'm new to regex expressions.

I just want to have a tiny expression that, given a word (we assume that the string is only one word), answers with a boolean, telling if the word is valid or not.

An example... I want to catch all words that is plausible to be in a dictionary... So, i just want words with chars from a-z A-Z, an hifen (for example: man-in-the-middle) and an aposthrofe (like I'll or Tiffany's).

Valid words:

  • "food"
  • "RocKet"
  • "man-in-the-middle"
  • "kahsdkjhsakdhakjsd"
  • "JESUS", etc.

Non-valid words:

  • "gipsy76"
  • "www.google.com"
  • "me@gmail.com"
  • "745474"
  • "+-x/", etc.

I use this code, but it won't gave the correct answer:

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("[A-Za-z&-&']");
Matcher m = p.matcher(s);
System.out.println(m.matches());

What's wrong with my regex?

share|improve this question
1  
Isn't it a bit naïve (perhaps even blasé) to assume that words only contain ASCII letters? –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 13 '11 at 10:08
1  
depends on the language (The one he speeks, not codes) :) And I think, as long as you just code for fun, there is no problem. –  Sibbo Oct 13 '11 at 10:13
    
Area-51? Deadmau5? –  Tom Medley Oct 13 '11 at 10:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  • Add a + after the expression to say "one or more of those characters":
  • Escape the hyphen with \ (or put it last).
  • Remove those & characters:

Here's the code:

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("[A-Za-z'-]+");
Matcher m = p.matcher(s);
System.out.println(m.matches());

Complete test:

String[] ok = {"food","RocKet","man-in-the-middle","kahsdkjhsakdhakjsd","JESUS"};
String[] notOk = {"gipsy76", "www.google.com", "me@gmail.com", "745474","+-x/" };

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("[A-Za-z'-]+");

for (String shouldMatch : ok)
    if (!p.matcher(shouldMatch).matches())
        System.out.println("Error on: " + shouldMatch);

for (String shouldNotMatch : notOk)
    if (p.matcher(shouldNotMatch).matches())
        System.out.println("Error on: " + shouldNotMatch);

(Produces no output.)

share|improve this answer
    
Why do you use the ' at the end of you regex? –  Sibbo Oct 13 '11 at 9:54
    
It should match for instance "Tiffany's" –  aioobe Oct 13 '11 at 9:54
    
oh, overread it –  Sibbo Oct 13 '11 at 9:56
1  
Pattern.compile("[A-Za-z'-]+") –  Prince John Wesley Oct 13 '11 at 9:58
1  
Thanks for the guick and (as always) correct answer :) –  nunoaac Oct 13 '11 at 10:06

This should work:

"[A-Za-z'-]+"

share|improve this answer
    
Note that with a * it matches the empty string, "" which presumably is not a word that can occur in a dictionary ;) –  aioobe Oct 13 '11 at 9:53
    
now it does ;-) –  Sibbo Oct 13 '11 at 9:57
    
Thanks for the guick and (as always) correct answer :) –  nunoaac Oct 13 '11 at 10:06

But "-word" and "word-" are not valid. So you can uses this pattern:

WORD_EXP = "^[A-Za-z]+(-[A-Za-z]+)*$"
share|improve this answer

Hi Aloob please check with this, Bit lengthy, might be having shorter version of this, Still...

[A-z]*||[[A-z]*[-]*]*||[[A-z]*[-]*[']*]*
share|improve this answer
    
why did you do this? –  Sibbo Oct 13 '11 at 10:11
    
Can you explain what you mean by this (it's obviously not a valid/working regular expression)? What's with all the double slashes, double pipes, nested brackets etc.? What do you think [A-z] does? –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 13 '11 at 10:12
    
@TimPietzcker Ok guys, I was just trying to get it, I apologize for this answer. It did work for me, thts why I just pasted it. [A-z] means it will compare both case letters. DOuble pipes means 'Or'. Sorry... –  Jithu Oct 13 '11 at 10:17
1  
[A-z] is wrong. You need [A-Za-z] because there are several characters between Z and a that aren't letters. Single pipes mean "or" in a regex, not double pipes. And you can't nest brackets like that; also * is treated as a literal asterisk inside a character class etc. etc... –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 13 '11 at 10:23
    
@TimPietzcker Thank you Tim, Indeed its a learning curve for me too.. –  Jithu Oct 13 '11 at 10:26

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