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I'm trying to get the return value of a utility method I wrote using jquery:

function loadFrames(coords, spritesheet) {
    return $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: coords,
        dataType: "xml",
        success: function(xml,code,obj) {return parseFrameData(xml, spritesheet);}
    });
}

So, this method receives two arguments, opens a file (the one pointed to by the "plist" argument) and runs the parseFrameData method. The latter returns an array of objects.

I would like to use this the following way:

var frames = loadFrames('player.xml', 'spritesheet.png');

but I don't find the way to say "return the value of the method you called on line starting with "'success:' "...

share|improve this question
    
I don't see the "plist" argument, what did you mean by that? – Slider345 Oct 13 '11 at 12:07
    
That's because you have forgotten that you're using an asynchronous call. The callback executes in a different context of execution than does loadFrames, which will pretty much always return long before the callback even fires. You also didn't bother searching or looking in the list of "Related" topics, as this has been asked millions of times before. – PreferenceBean Oct 13 '11 at 12:09
    
Entirely, completely a duplicate of jQuery: Return data after ajax call success – PreferenceBean Oct 13 '11 at 12:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit: An answer posted to the question @Tomalak linked to informed me of this cool concept of 'Promises', which you might also want to take a look at.

The point of using $.ajax is generally to make asynchronous requests. Calling it and expecting a value to be returned immediately would be a synchronous request.

That being said, you can do what you're asking by using $.ajax in synchronous mode by setting async:false. This may have the affect of locking your browser until the request completes.

function loadFrames(coords, spritesheet) {
  var myFrames;

  $.ajax({
    type: "GET",
    url: coords,
    dataType: "xml",
    async: false,
    success: function(xml,code,obj) {myFrames = parseFrameData(xml, spritesheet);}
  });
  return myFrames;
}

var frames = loadFrames('player.xml', 'spritesheet.png');

I believe that is will work, but I don't have a good way to test it. Can anyone else confirm this approach?

Still it would be much better to do this asynchronously the way @Petah suggests.

share|improve this answer
    
testing this :-) – Jem Oct 13 '11 at 18:08
    
Yes indeed, very useful when the loaded resources need to be available right after finishing the execution of the utility method. Thanks for the help! It's a great solution to my blocker! – Jem Oct 13 '11 at 18:49
    
"You will also need to use a global variable to accomplish this..." Absolutely not, just use a local variable within the loadFrames function. But even better is to use a callback as demonstrated in this other answer, synchronous requests make for a poor user experience. – T.J. Crowder Oct 24 '11 at 6:45
    
@T.J.Crowder - good point! I have revised my answer to demonstrate this. Also I had two 'return's in there which was wrong. – Slider345 Oct 24 '11 at 18:56

Ajax runs asynchronously (meaning in the background, allowing other things to continue) so you wont be able to directly return a value from it.

How ever, you can pass the function a callback that will be called once the Ajax request is finished.

function loadFrames(coords, spritesheet, callback) {
    $.ajax({
        type: "GET",
        url: coords,
        dataType: "xml",
        success: function(xml,code,obj) { callback(parseFrameData(xml, spritesheet)); }
    });
}

Also, on a side note, dont forget to check for HTTP errors like 404 and 500 by passing a error paramter to the ajax call

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks, that's great. Wasn't aware of async processing in that case. – Jem Oct 13 '11 at 18:50

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