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I have an app that needs to do something when it’s sent to background using the Home button and something else when the device is locked using the top hardware button. The standard way of solving these requirements are the notifications and delegate methods sent out by UIApplication. On iOS 4 they look like this:

// Pressing the home button
Will resign active.
Did enter background.
// Tapping app icon on Springboard
Will enter foreground.
Did become active.

// Pressing the lock button
Will resign active.
// Unlocking the device
Did become active.

In other words, it’s quite easy to tell between locking and backgrounding. On iOS 5 the behaviour changed:

// Pressing the home button
Will resign active.
Did enter background.
// Tapping app icon on Springboard
Will enter foreground.
Did become active.

// Pressing the lock button
Will resign active.
Did enter background.
// Unlocking the device
Will enter foreground.
Did become active.

Notice that the didEnterBackground and willEnterForeground notifications are now sent out even when (un)locking the device, making it impossible to tell between locking and backgrounding. Is this change documented somewhere? Is it a regression? Do you know another way to distinguish the two cases?

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1  
Apple clearly don't want you to distinguish between these events. So if you do find a workaround it might lead to your app being rejected. –  finnw Oct 16 '11 at 21:06
3  
It could not find the issue in the documentation and it used to work differently in iOS 4, so it doesn’t seem as “clear” to me. –  zoul Oct 17 '11 at 5:43
    
This is how I do it. stackoverflow.com/questions/19595928/… Both work on iOS6 & iOS7. –  wqq Feb 22 '14 at 18:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 26 down vote accepted

iOS 6

In my preliminary testing via the simulator, checking the application state with

[[UIApplication sharedApplication] applicationState]

in either

- (void)applicationWillEnterForeground:(UIApplication *)application

- (void)applicationDidEnterBackground:(UIApplication *)application

allows you to differentiate between a call to lock the device and just switching back to the homescreen. A lock screen will return 1 (UIApplicationStateInactive), whereas a home button press will register as a 2 (UIApplicationStateBackground).

It seems consistent and should work on an iOS device just as reliably as it does in the simulator.

iOS 7

The iOS 6 method no longer works in iOS 7. In order to do this now, you have to utilize CFNotificationCenter and listen for a darwin notification (labeled: com.apple.springboard.lockcomplete). You can find the github repo with the sample project here: https://github.com/binarydev/ios-home-vs-lock-button

Credit for the iOS 7 fix goes out to wqq

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2  
Actually, purely from the names of those methods, you shouldn't be able to say with any certainty in willEnterForeground: whether the state will return 1 or 2 in different cases, and the state should always be 2 in didEnterBackground:. I wouldn't rely on this behaviour remaining the same even to the next minor iOS version. –  darvids0n Jan 30 '12 at 0:17
1  
Actually, didEnterBackground is always called as of 5.0, whether you are locking the screen but not leaving the app, or actually leaving the app via the home button. I've tested on the iPad 1 and, and both show the same behavior. This is because when you lock the screen, it will call didEnterBackground, but the UIApplicationStatus will be UIApplicationStateInactive because the app is still in the foreground behind the lock screen. Leaving the app in any way though produces UIApplicationStateBackground like it should. I would not consider this liable to change in any near future version. –  Jose Rafael Santiago Jr. Feb 1 '12 at 21:30
2  
I can confirm this works on both iOS 5 and iOS 6 devices. Thanks! –  sup Nov 25 '12 at 8:19
    
@JoseRafaelSantiagoJr. Hi Jose Rafael, I have same problem but this is not working for iOS 7. Is there any way to differentiate these two states in iOS 7. –  Archive Feb 3 '14 at 11:57
    
@Archive I've confirmed that this has in fact changed in iOS 7. Another stackoverflow user has found a solution, and I've posted a github repo with a sample project showing how to detect this, here: github.com/binarydev/ios-home-vs-lock-button –  Jose Rafael Santiago Jr. Feb 24 '14 at 17:29

Here is what Apple's iOS Programming Guide says:

Pressing the Sleep/Wake button is another type of interruption that causes your app to be deactivated temporarily. When the user presses this button, the system disables touch events, moves the app to the background but sets the value of the app’s applicationState property to UIApplicationStateInactive (as opposed to UIApplicationStateBackground), and finally locks the screen.

http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#DOCUMENTATION/iPhone/conceptual/iPhoneOSProgrammingGuide/ManagingYourApplicationsFlow/ManagingYourApplicationsFlow.html

So, you should check the UIApplication's applicationState property in applicationDidEnterBackground:. If it is UIApplicationStateBackground the user pressed the home button. But if it is UIApplicationStateInactive the user locked the device.

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1  
FWIW, in my testing on iOS 7 this does not appear to be true. In fact, I never see a value of UIApplicationStateInactive anywhere. –  Bungles Aug 26 '14 at 23:18

I have looked into this quite a bit so I would love to be wrong here if someone knows something I don't, but technically, there is no documented way to tell the difference between locking the device, and sending to background.

One thing you can check however, is the UIApplicationState during the transition from foreground to background. Locking a device will give UIApplicationStateInactive and moving the App to the background will give UIApplicationStateBackground. But, since this behaviour is not officially documented it may change in the future.

A basic example:

- (void)applicationDidEnterBackground:(UIApplication *)application {
    UIApplicationState state = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] applicationState];
    NSLog(@"Device state: %@", state);
    switch (state) {
        case UIApplicationStateActive:
            /* ... */
            break;
        case UIApplicationStateInactive:
            /* Device was/is locked  */
            break;
        case UIApplicationStateBackground:
            /* User pressed home button or opened another App (from an alert/email/etc) */
            break;
    }
}

UIApplicationState - The running states of an application

typedef enum {
    UIApplicationStateActive,   
    UIApplicationStateInactive,
    UIApplicationStateBackground
}

UIApplicationState

Constants

UIApplicationStateActive - The application is running in the foreground and currently receiving events. Available in iOS 4.0 and later.

UIApplicationStateInactive - The application is running in the foreground but is not receiving events. This might happen as a result of an interruption or because the application is transitioning to or from the background.

UIApplicationStateBackground - The application is running in the background.


According to the UIApplicationDelegate Protocol Reference:

applicationWillResignActive:
didEnterBackground:
// ...
willEnterForeground:
applicationDidBecomeActive:

are the only methods that ever get called in both situations.


According to the iOS 4.3 to iOS 5.0 API Diff, these are the ONLY changes regarding UIApplication or UIApplicationDelegate, so I couldn't find where they documented any of these notification changes:

UIApplication.h
Added -[UIApplication setNewsstandIconImage:]
Added UIApplication.userInterfaceLayoutDirection
Added UIApplicationDelegate.window
Added UIApplication(UINewsstand)
Added UIApplicationLaunchOptionsNewsstandDownloadsKey
Added UIRemoteNotificationTypeNewsstandContentAvailability
Added UIUserInterfaceLayoutDirection
Added UIUserInterfaceLayoutDirectionLeftToRight
Added UIUserInterfaceLayoutDirectionRightToLeft
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Just an FYI - this behavior has changed in iOS 8 + Swift. Locking the device while the app is in the foreground now uses UIApplicationStateBackground –  Dylan Bettermann May 29 at 15:48

This is more of a workaround/hack, but according to my experience it's very reliable. When the device is screen-locked (not just home button-ed, if that's a word :)) - bound network (UDP) sockets are broken. I was using GCDAsyncUDPSocket (also AsyncUDPSocket before) and they both fire a network/broken pipe error reliably when the device is turned off. In my case I need the UDP socket anyway, for other apps it might be a bit smelly, however, just binding/listening on a UDP socket without any action is not too terrible if you really need to differentiate here.

This note will [self destruct]; is 5 minutes (so Apple won't find out).

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There’s a thread about this issue on Apple Developer Forums (registered developers only, sorry). The gist is that the new behaviour is by design. There are requests for a new API feature to distinguish between the two use cases, but nothing working yet.

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1  
are there any news? –  Janky Nov 23 '11 at 10:58
1  
Check out my answer below for a promising solution. –  Jose Rafael Santiago Jr. Jan 30 '12 at 0:13

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