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Why is it bad to name a variable 'id' in Python?

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12  
Most people append an underscore to identifiers that clash with builtins/keywords: id_, map_, list_, filter_, etc. –  cdleary Nov 1 '08 at 23:11

9 Answers 9

up vote 76 down vote accepted

id() is a fundamental built-in:

Help on built-in function id in module __builtin__:

id(...)

    id(object) -> integer

    Return the identity of an object.  This is guaranteed to be unique among
    simultaneously existing objects.  (Hint: it's the object's memory
    address.)

In general, using variable names that eclipse a keyword or built-in function in any language is a bad idea, even if it is allowed.

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3  
OK, for 'id' you're right, but the "in general..." comment still applies, don't you think? –  Kevin Little Sep 19 '08 at 17:55
3  
I would avoid it for module globals certainly. For variables restricted to local scope, so you can see the same function isn't ever going to need to use the builtin, it's not something I'd worry about. –  bobince Feb 2 '09 at 17:13
    
@Caramdir: Good catch, id was slated for removal at one time, but eventually they decided not to remove it. I'm no longer able to edit my original comment, so I'll delete it to avoid confusing people in the future. –  Eli Courtwright Mar 4 '14 at 14:10

id is a built-in function that gives the memory address of an object. If you name one of your functions id, you will have to say __builtins__.id to get the original. Renaming id globally is confusing in anything but a small script.

However, reusing built-in names as variables isn't all that bad as long as the use is local. Python has a lot of built-in functions that (1) have common names and (2) you will not use much anyway. Using these as local variables or as members of an object is OK because it's obvious from context what you're doing:

Example:

def numbered(filename):
  file = open(filename)
  for i,input in enumerate(file):
    print "%s:\t%s" % (i,input)
  file.close()

Some built-ins with tempting names:

  • id
  • file
  • list
  • map
  • all, any
  • complex
  • dir
  • input
  • slice
  • buffer
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1  
PEP 8, which was updated 01-Aug-2013, now advises avoiding potential confusion by simply appending _ to the variable name. Please see my answer. –  DavidRR Jan 22 at 14:28

I might say something unpopular here: id() is a rather specialized built-in function that is rarely used in business logic. Therefore I don't see a problem in using it as a variable name in a tight and well-written function, where it's clear that id doesn't mean the built-in function.

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1  
In response to: > id is a rather specialized built-in > function that is rarely used in > business logic. Therefore I don't see > a problem in using it as a variable > name in a tight and well-written > function, whre it's clear that id > doesn't mean the built-in function. While this is true, it's probably a good idea to be more specific with this variable name than simply "id". Lots of things have IDs (especially if you're working with a RDBMS), and as the second line of Tim Peters's The Zen of Python tells us: > Explicit is better than implicit. See the rest by running: import this –  Ross Sep 17 '08 at 3:00
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I would still avoid it if at all possible though. Even if for no other reason than to not hear coworkers complain. :-) –  Jason Baker Feb 2 '09 at 16:29
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I completely agree: naming a variable "id" in a small function (and thus scope) is harmless. Very few people use the id builtin anyway. That said it took me a while when a colleague overrode the list builtin with a local variable. So the general rule other people mention still makes sense. –  silviot Aug 30 '12 at 13:42
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what a bad name for a builtin .... –  Joran Beasley Nov 30 '12 at 21:24

Because it's the name of a builtin function.

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In PEP 8 - Style Guide for Python Code, the following guidance appears in the section Descriptive: Naming Styles :

  • single_trailing_underscore_ : used by convention to avoid conflicts with Python keyword, e.g.

    Tkinter.Toplevel(master, class_='ClassName')

So, to answer the question, an example that applies this guideline is:

id_ = 42

Including the trailing underscore in the variable name makes the intent clear (to those familiar with the guidance in PEP 8).

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It's bad to name any variable after a built in function. One of the reasons is because it can be confusing to a reader that doesn't know the name is overridden.

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'id' is a built-in method in Python. Assigning a value to 'id' will overwrite the method. It is best to use either an identifier before as in "some_id" or use it in a different capitalization method.

The built in method takes a single parameter and returns an integer for the memory address of the object that you passed.

>>>id(1)

9787760

>>>x = 1

>>>id(x)

9787760

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1  
note that you can name a class attribute or method 'id', that won't touch the built in function. –  Toni Ruža Sep 16 '08 at 21:59

Because id is a built in function

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Because python is a dynamic language, it's not usually a good idea to give a variable and a function the same name. id() is a function in python, so it's recommend not to use a variable named id. Bearing that in mind, that applies to all functions that you might use... a variable shouldn't have the same name as a function.

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"Because python is a dynamic language, it's not usually a good idea to give a variable and a function the same name." -- You cannot give a variable and a function the same name. Nothing to do with it being a dynamic language. If you mean giving properties the same names as other objects in the same scope, I also disagree. You may have a class called "Key", an instance of that class called "key" and a property of another object called "key", e.g., "door.key". –  Purrell Nov 1 '12 at 6:58

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