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Let's take a list as an example:

a = [255, 255, 1, 255, 255, 255, 1, 2, 255, 255, 2, 255, 255, 3, 255, 3, 255, 255, 255]

255 is a special value in it. It's a placeholder.

I've made a generator which replaces some of the placeholder inside the list. It works as expected.

But I need not to process the beginning placeholders [255, 255 and the ending placeholders 255, 255, 255] and yield them intact.

So, I tried to modify the generator to work it out:

Python 2.7

from __future__ import print_function
from  itertools import tee, izip, ifilterfalse

def replace(iterable,placeholder=255):
    it = enumerate(iterable) #the position is needed for the logic for the middle of the list
    it = ifilterfalse(lambda x: x[1]==placeholder, it) #create an iterator that deletes all the placeholders
    for i,(left,right) in enumerate(window(it,2)): #Slide through the filtered list with the window of 2 elements
        if i==0: #Leaving the beginning placeholders intact
            for j in range(left[0]):
                yield placeholder

        #SOME LOGIC FOR THE MIDDLE OF THE LIST (it works well)

    #Need to leave the trailing placeholders intact.

The interim values converted to list just to ease the comprehension of the code:

>>>iterable
[255,1,255,255,1,255,255,255,2,2,255,255,255,2,2,3,255,255,255,3,255,255]

>>>it = enumerate(iterable)
[(0, 255), (1, 1), (2, 255), (3, 255), (4, 1), (5, 255), (6, 255), (7, 255), (8, 2), (9, 2), (10, 255), (11, 255), (12, 255), (13, 2), (14, 2), (15, 3), (16, 255), (17, 255), (18, 255), (19, 3), (20, 255), (21, 255)]

>>>it = ifilterfalse(lambda x: x[1]==placeholder, it)
[(1, 1), (4, 1), (8, 2), (9, 2), (13, 2), (14, 2), (15, 3), (19, 3)]

>>>list(enumerate(window(it,2)))
[(0, ((1, 1), (4, 1))), (1, ((4, 1), (8, 2))), (2, ((8, 2), (9, 2))), (3, ((9, 2), (13, 2))), (4, ((13, 2), (14, 2))), (5, ((14, 2), (15, 3))), (6, ((15, 3), (19, 3)))]

So, as you can see, the list(enumerate(window(it,2))) contains the index of the leading non-placeholder value (0, ((**1**, 1), (4, 1))),, but it doesn't contain the information how many trailing placeholder the initial iterator had: list(enumerate(window(it,2))) ends in this value (6, ((15, 3), (**19**, 3))) which has only the index of the last non-placeholder value, which doesn't give the information how many placeholders are left.

I managed to process the leading placeholders by relying on it = enumerate(iterable) which yields the position of the initial iterator value which persists in the first yielded value by ifilterfalse.

But I spent quite a lot of time trying to figure out how to do the same thing with the trailing placeholders. The problem is that ifilterfalse just swallows the last placeholder values of enumerate(iterable) and I see no way to access them (it was possible for the leading placeholders since the first generated value of ifilterfalse contained the index of the value of the enumerate(iterable)).

Question

What is the best way to correct this code for it to process the trailing placeholders?

As the goal is not to create a code by all means (I have already done it using a different technique), I want to solve the task by tinkering a bit wit the code, not a complete rewriting it.

It's more of a training than a real task.

Additional information

window is the code from here.

My code does nearly the same as in this answer by @nye17. But in this code the author make inplace modifications of the initial list. And I want to create a generator which will be yielding the same values as the resultant list in that code.

Furthermore, I want my generator to accept any iterables as a parameter, not only lists (for example it may accept the iterator which reads the values from file one by one). With having only lists as a parameter, the task becomes simpler, since we can scan the list from the end.

This is not a real task I have to solve in life. It's just for a training.

Full code http://codepad.org/9UJ9comY

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Where did the list come from? Can you fix that code? 255 seems like a rather un-Pythonic sort of placeholder. It's also not really clear what the logic is for placeholder replacement. –  Karl Knechtel Oct 13 '11 at 16:29
    
@Knechtel Good point. But I have no idea. I found this task here stackoverflow.com/q/7745367/862380. While trying to write a code, I faced some problems. For me the task is purely for learning and for fun. –  ovgolovin Oct 13 '11 at 16:45
    
@Knechtel In the first version of the question, the placeholder was 0, but then I noticed some inconsistency with the other question that I mentioned above, so I decided to replace all 0 with 255 for the question to be compatible with the other question. –  ovgolovin Oct 13 '11 at 16:47
    
@Knechtel About the logic for placeholder replacement. As I understood, if the placeholders are between 2 non-placeholders values which are the same, the placeholders are changed to those values. And if the values are different, the placeholder stays intact. What I'm trying to figure out in this question is how to keep the leading and trailing placeholders intact (not changed). –  ovgolovin Oct 13 '11 at 16:50

3 Answers 3

def replace(it, process, placeholder):
    it = iter(it)
    while True:
        item = it.next()
        if item == placeholder:
            yield item
        else:
            yield process(item)
    pcount = 0
    try:
        while True:
            item = it.next()
            if item == placeholder:
                pcount += 1
            else:
                for i in range(pcount):
                    yield process(placeholder)
                pcount = 0
                yield process(item)
    except StopIteration:
        for i in range(pcount):
            yield placeholder

Use it like this:

>>> a = [0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 3, 0, 3, 0, 0, 0]
>>> [x for x in replace(a, lambda n: n+20, 0)]
[0, 0, 21, 20, 20, 20, 21, 22, 20, 20, 22, 20, 20, 23, 20, 23, 0, 0, 0]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! So, you rely in your code on having all the iterable in the memory (len(iterable); range(...,-1); etc.). The problem is I want to implement lazy evaluations. So that the values of the iterable can even be read from file one by one. –  ovgolovin Oct 13 '11 at 14:33
    
I only need the access to the index variable of the enumberate(iterable). And by comparing it with the index of ifilterfalse it's possible to determine how many placeholder have to be yielded. But I don't know how to get THE INDEX :) –  ovgolovin Oct 13 '11 at 14:35
    
Ah. So you want to pass an iterator, not an iterable. –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 13 '11 at 14:35
    
Sorry for iterable. I thought it's the same as iterator. –  ovgolovin Oct 13 '11 at 14:37
    
iterable seems to include iterators. Looking in the docs we can see that iterable as an agrubment of all the functions. E.g. def chain(*iterables): accepts lists, or any iterators, or any other values that can be iterated over. –  ovgolovin Oct 13 '11 at 14:46
def replace(it, placeholder):
    while True:
        curr = it.next()
        if curr == placeholder:
            yield curr
        else:
            break

    yield curr

    try:
        cache = []
        while True:      
            curr = it.next()

            if curr == placeholder:
                cache.append(curr)
            else:
                for cached in cache:
                    yield TRANSFORM(cached)
                yield curr
                cache = []

    except StopIteration:
        for cached in cache:
            yield cache
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The simplest solution I came up with is to process it = enumerate(iterable) through one more generator which just saves the last returned value by it.

So, I added the following code after it = enumerate(iterable) (inside the replace function):

def save_last(iterable):
        for i in iterable:
            yield i
        replace.last_index = i[0] #Save the last value
it = save_last(it)

After iterable is exhausted, the last operator of the generator saves the index of the yielded value (which is i[0] as enumerate stores it at the position 0 of tupele) as the replace attribute (since replace function is a instance of a class, which can have local variables).

The it is wrapped in the newly created generator save_last.

At the very end of the function I added the code which uses the saved index in replace.last_index variable.

if right[0]<replace.last_index:
    for i in range(replace.last_index-right[0]):
        yield placeholder

The full code:

from __future__ import print_function
from  itertools import tee, izip, ifilterfalse


def window(iterable,n):
    els = tee(iterable,n)
    for i,el in enumerate(els):
        for _ in range(i):
            next(el, None)
    return izip(*els)


def replace(iterable,placeholder=255):
    it = enumerate(iterable)

    def save_last(iterable):
        for i in iterable:
            yield i
        replace.last_index = i[0] #Save the last value
    it = save_last(it)

    it = ifilterfalse(lambda x: x[1]==placeholder, it)
    for i,(left,right) in enumerate(window(it,2)):
        if i==0:
            for j in range(left[0]):
                yield placeholder
        yield left[1]
        if right[0]>left[0]+1:
            if left[1]==right[1]:
                for _ in range(right[0]-left[0]-1):
                    yield left[1]
            else:
                for _ in range(right[0]-left[0]-1):
                    yield placeholder
    yield right[1]
    if right[0]<replace.last_index:
        for i in range(replace.last_index-right[0]):
            yield placeholder


a = [255,1,255,255,1,255,255,255,2,2,255,255,255,2,2,3,255,255,255,3,255,255]        
print('\nInput: {}'.format(a))
output = list(replace(a))
print('Proram output: {}'.format(output))
print('Goal output  : {}'.format([255,1,1,1,1,255,255,255,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,255,255]))

Which works as expected:

Input: [255, 1, 255, 255, 1, 255, 255, 255, 2, 2, 255, 255, 255, 2, 2, 3, 255, 255, 255, 3, 255, 255]
Proram output: [255, 1, 1, 1, 1, 255, 255, 255, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 255, 255]
Goal output  : [255, 1, 1, 1, 1, 255, 255, 255, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 255, 255]

The only thing that I don't like is the combination of very efficient written in C ifilterfalse and save_last written in Python.

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