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I am separating my views and router into separate files with require. I then have a main.js file that instantiates the router, and also renders my default view.

My router has view ('View/:id') and edit ('Edit/:id') as routes. In main.js, when I instantiate the router, I can hardcode router.navigate('View/1', true) and the navigation works fine. In my view file, when I click on the edit link, I want to call router.navigate('View/' + id, true), but I'm not sure how I should do this.

I've had success calling Backbone.history.navigate('View/' + id, true), but I don't feel like I should be relying on the global Backbone object.

I tried passing ({ router: appRouter }) to my views so I could use this.options.router.navigate(), however that wasn't working for me.

In case you're curious, here's a bunch of code from my app:

Router:

define(['./View', './Edit'], function (View, Edit) {
    return Backbone.Router.extend({
        routes: {
            'View/:id': 'view',
            'Edit/:id': 'edit'
        },

        view: function (id) {
            var model = this.collection.get(id);
            var view = new View({ model: model });
            view.render();
        },

        edit: function (id) {
            var model = this.collection.get(id);
            var edit = new Edit({ model: model });
            edit.render();
        }
    });
});

View:

define(function () {
    return Backbone.View.extend({
        template: Handlebars.compile($('#template').html()),

        events: {
            'click .edit': 'edit'
        },

        render: function () {
            //Create and insert the cover letter view
            $(this.el).html(this.template(this.model.toJSON()));
            $('#View').html(this.el);

            return this;
        },

        edit: function () {
            Backbone.history.navigate('Edit/' + this.model.id, true); 
        },
    });
});
share|improve this question
    
Hi man, I'm doing something like yours, intending to use router.navigate() in my View module. And how did you achieve this finally? Thx very much in advance. –  chaonextdoor Apr 28 '12 at 10:06
4  
I ended up using Backgone.history.navigate. Since I'm separating my views into individual files for the views, router, and models, and using require.js to load them. It was too much trouble to pass a router, or an event object to all of my views. The global seemed to make the most sense, since Backbone was in the global namespace already anyway. –  MrGrigg Apr 30 '12 at 14:56
1  
so backbone.history.navigate is equal to router.navigate? –  chaonextdoor Apr 30 '12 at 15:01
    
I just tested and it real works. Thanks, man. –  chaonextdoor Apr 30 '12 at 15:07
    
@chaonextdoor Remember that in the global namespace Backbone is case sensitive. –  MrGrigg May 1 '12 at 19:01

8 Answers 8

up vote 18 down vote accepted

As with pretty much any Backbone question, there are lots of ways to handle this. The way I approached it in my current project was to put everything in a global custom namespace, and use that to pass around the necessary references:

var MyNamespace = {};

MyNamespace.init = function() {
    MyNamespace.appView = new MyAppView();
    MyNamespace.router = new MyRouter();
    // etc
}

Views could then refer to MyNamespace.router as necessary. But it looks like this won't work/isn't encouraged with require.js, so here are some other options:

  • Don't ever call the router explicitly - instead, change a global state object that the router listens to. This is actually how I've done things in my current project - see this response for more details.

  • Attach the router to your top-level view, often called AppView, make that globally accessible, and use AppView.router.navigate().

  • Make another module that provides a navigate utility function that calls Backbone.history.navigate() internally. This isn't much different from what you're doing, but it would make it slightly more modular and keep you from using the global reference all the time. This also allows you to change the internal implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you declaring MyNamespace outside of the require modules? This is close to using the global Backbone object, just with my own object, right? –  MrGrigg Oct 13 '11 at 17:55
    
I'm not using require.js, so it doesn't apply in my case. I think the last bullet in my list is probably the closest to the require.js idiom. –  nrabinowitz Oct 13 '11 at 19:06
    
Yeah, my own utility to call navigate isn't such a bad idea. If I were to do that, i could probably make the same utility present my router as an option, maybe that would solve the whole thing. –  MrGrigg Oct 14 '11 at 14:53

In case anyone else is looking for a solution to this problem like I was, I'm posting what I ended up doing. If you're using the boilerplate backbone.js, then you will have an initialize() function in router.js. I modified my initialize() function to look like the following:

initialize = function () {
  var app_router;
  app_router = new AppRouter();

  // Extend the View class to include a navigation method goTo
  Backbone.View.goTo = function (loc) {
    app_router.navigate(loc, true);
  };

  Backbone.history.start();
};

Due to backbone.js's particular flavour of inheritance, this allows allows me to call MyView.goTo(location); from within any of my views.

share|improve this answer
7  
I had to use Backbone.View.prototype.goTo = –  Peter Ajtai Apr 10 '13 at 18:24
    
can you use this within a view, in a success callback or how would you go about it? Here is the question I have up if you want to see the code I am referring to... stackoverflow.com/questions/19472777/… –  Lion789 Oct 20 '13 at 6:27
    
Very elegant solution! Thanks a lot for this. I've used the Backbone.View.prototype for another function but this one didn't come into my mind. –  digaomatias Jun 18 at 13:52

You could do it the old fashioned way with window.location.hash :)

window.location.hash = "Edit/1"

Here's an alternate solution if you don't need explicit routes. When you app starts up create an object that extends Backbone Events

window.EventDispatcher = _.extend({}, Backbone.Events);

Then anywhere in you app you can listen for events

EventDispatcher.bind("mymodel:edit", this.editHandler, this);

And also from anywhere dispatch the event, data below are any params you want to send along for the ride

EventDispatcher.trigger("mymodel:edit", data);
share|improve this answer
    
I tried using window.location before I found I could use the global Backbone object, but it wasn't actually firing my events, which is probably an entirely different problem. –  MrGrigg Oct 13 '11 at 17:53
    
If you're using routes only for triggering events (you don't need the url to visibly change, or for the user to use the back/forward buttons), then something I figured out this afternoon might help. You can make a global 'EventDispatcher' which I added to my answer above. –  kreek Oct 13 '11 at 22:47
    
Thanks KreeK. I've gone back and forth with wanting the URL to matter for this particular app. I've seen at least one other example similar to your global event dispatcher. Thanks for your help. –  MrGrigg Oct 14 '11 at 14:52

For me, the solution with goTo function worked with a slight change

 Backbone.View.prototype.goTo = function (loc) {
      appRouter.navigate(loc, true);
    };
share|improve this answer

I know this question is old, but I am wondering why haven't you use require.js in order to get the router:

define(['./PathToRouter', ], function (router) {
    return Backbone.View.extend({
        template: Handlebars.compile($('#template').html()),

        events: {
            'click .edit': 'edit'
        },

        render: function () {
            //Create and insert the cover letter view
            $(this.el).html(this.template(this.model.toJSON()));
            $('#View').html(this.el);

            return this;
        },

        edit: function () {
            router.navigate('Edit/' + this.model.id, true);
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know why I didn't think of this either. The majority of things I've done since haven't required routes so I haven't revisited this for quite some time. I'm glad you chimed in though. –  MrGrigg Oct 25 '12 at 16:18
2  
In the example above, ./PathToRouter is not instance of a Router but a class definition. The only static method of a backbone Router is extend no navigate! –  LarZuK Oct 29 '12 at 18:41
    
@LarZuK I'm so far removed from this problem that I didn't even think of that, but you're totally correct. –  MrGrigg Oct 29 '12 at 19:17
1  
@LarZuK: You absolutely right. I forgot that. But, instead, you can pass a property to the view: new MyView({router: router }); and then accessing it using options.router. –  Naor Oct 29 '12 at 19:31
    
Passing the router in as an option like @Naor suggested is the only option if your router instantiates views. Otherwise you'll have circular dependencies with require.js (Router requires views, views require router). –  chiborg Nov 5 '12 at 10:34

What about this approach? As backbone implements the template pattern in all its 4 components, with a little of design you can provide to each view an easy navigation mechanism through the app's router without needing to make any circular reference (this was something I saw in other similar posts, but try to avoid it).

Router component, not to much different from other router examples:

define('Router', ['backbone', ... ],
        function (Backbone, ...) {

            var MyRouter = Backbone.Router.extend({
                routes: {
                    'viewA': 'viewA',
                    'viewB': 'viewB'
                },

                initialize: function () {
                    ...
                };
            },
            viewA: function () {
                ...
            },

            viewB: function () {
                ...
            }
});

return MyRouter;
});

App, creates the router instance and fires the first view passing this instance:

define('App', ['backbone', ...
], function (Backbone, ...) {

    function initialize() {

        //route creation
        if (!this.routes)
            routes = new Router(this); 
        //backbone history start
        Backbone.history.start();

        //ViewA navigation, bigbang
        if (!this.viewA)
            this.viewA = new ViewA({router: this.routes});
        this.viewA.render();
    }

    return {
        initialize: initialize
    };
});

BaseView, base constructor definition for all views and also a navigation method:

define('BaseView', ['jquery', 'underscore',  'backbone', ...
], function ($, _, Backbone, ...) {
    var BaseView;

    BaseView = Backbone.View.extend({
        id: '...',

        constructor: function (options) {
            this.router = options.router;
            this.model = options.model;
            Backbone.View.prototype.constructor.call(this);
        },
        initialize: function () {
            this.template = _.template(tpl);
        },

        events: {

        },
        render: function () {
            $(this.el).html(this.template());

            return this;
        },
        //Provides transparent navigation between views throught the backbonejs
        //route mechanism
        navigate: function(pageId)
        {
            this.router.navigate(pageId, {trigger: true});
        }
    });

    return BaseView;
});

A View instance, each view extends from the base one instead of backbone, and inherits base behavior:

define('ViewA', ['jquery', 'underscore',  'backbone', 'BaseView'
], function ($, _, Backbone, BaseView) {
    var ViewA;

    ViewA = BaseView.extend({
        id: '...',

        constructor: function (options) {
            this._super("constructor");
        },

        ...
        foo: function()
        {
            ...

            this.navigate("viewB");
        }
    });

    return ViewA;
});

It works for me, and also it can be reuse in other projects.

share|improve this answer

for me i added an object to the main application like so;

define(['jquery','underscore','backbone','views/personView','views/peopleView','views/textView'],function($,_,backbone,PersonView,PeopleView,TitleView){

    var Router = Backbone.Router.extend({
           routes:{
               '':'home',
               'edit/:id':'editPerson',
               'new':'editPerson',
               'delete/:id':'deletePerson'
               }
            })

              var initialize = function(){

                 var router  = new Router();

                 window.app = {
                     router:router
                     }

        router.on('route:home',function(){


    })

            //enable routing using '#'[hashtag] navigation
        Backbone.history.start();

            };

            return {
            initialize:initialize
            };

});

and inside your view, you can say windows.app.router.navigate({'',trigger:true}) . Don't know if global scoping is good practice in this case, but it worked for me.

share|improve this answer

I have a new solution for routing AMD modules.

RequireJS Router https://github.com/erikringsmuth/requirejs-router

This takes the approach of lazy loading AMD modules as you navigate to each page. With the Backbone router you need to require all of your views as dependencies up front. This loads all of your apps Javascript on the first page load. The RequireJS Router lazy loads modules as you navigate to each route.

Example main.js used to run your app

define([], function() {
  'use strict';

  // Configure require.js paths and shims
  require.config({
    paths: {
      'text': 'bower_components/requirejs-text/text',
      'router': 'bower_components/requirejs-router/router'
    }
  });

  // Load the router and your layout
  require(['router', 'js/layout/layoutView'], function(router, LayoutView) {
    var layoutView = new LayoutView();
    // The layout's render method should draw the header, footer, and an empty main-content section
    // then load the content section.
    // render: function() {
    //   this.$el.html(this.template({model: this.model}));
    //   router.loadCurrentRoute();
    // }

    // Configure the router
    router
      .registerRoutes({
        home: {path: '/', moduleId: 'home/homeView'},
        order: {path: '/order', moduleId: 'order/orderView'},
        notFound: {path: '*', moduleId: 'notFound/notFoundView'}
      })
      .on('statechange', function() {
        // Render the layout before loading the current route's module
        layoutView.render.call(layoutView);
      })
      .on('routeload', function(module, routeArguments) {
        // Attach the content view to the layoutView's main-content section
        layoutView.$('#main-content').replaceWith(new module(routeArguments).render().el);
      })
      .init({
        // We're manually calling loadCurrentRoute() from layoutView.render()
        loadCurrentRouteOnStateChange: false
      });
  );
);
share|improve this answer

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