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Why can b list be found in some_list even though it's not in some_list?

>>> a = []
>>> b = []
>>> a is b
False
>>> some_list = [0, 1, 2, 3, a]
>>> some_list.index(b)
4
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Python's list.index searches tests for equality, not identity. a and b are not identical, but equal:

>>> a = []
>>> b = []
>>> a == b
True

Define __eq__ on your objects a,b if you want a different definition of equality, for example:

def __eq__(self, other):
  return self is other
def __hash__(self):
  return 0 # Insert a more sensible, object-specific hash function here
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.index returns 4th position because it compares a and b, two empty lists. They are equal. If you do a is b, it compares the memory addresses of objects, and they are different, that's why this expression evaluates to False.

In [1]: a = []
In [2]: b = []
In [3]: a == b
Out[3]: True
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1  
Additional: Lists are mutable, so each assignment of [] to a variable results in a different object in memory. a=[]; b=[]; a is b # returns False. An example of the converse are Strings which are immutable. Assigning the same string value to different variables essentially point to the same object in memory. a="Hello"; b="Hello"; a is b # returns True. –  tom Oct 13 '11 at 14:37
2  
@tom: That's an implementation detail for small strings, but a = "Hello" * 1000; b = "Hello" * 1000; (a is b) == False. –  eryksun Oct 13 '11 at 14:58
    
Thanks eryksun, I didn't know that! So: a="Hello"+"World"; b="Hello"+"World"; (a is b) == False. –  tom Oct 13 '11 at 16:05
1  
@tom it may or may not be, depending on the implementation. There is no reason to expect either outcome specifically, and no reason to write code that expects either outcome. –  Karl Knechtel Oct 13 '11 at 16:22

They are different:

a is b

is true only if they are both bound to the same object. However, index only checks if the values are equal.

To put a C example, 3 == 3 but

int a = 3;
int b = 3;
&a == &b // this is false
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Try to execute the a == b. The '==' operator checks, if the values of variables are the same, and so does the index function. The is function comapres the variables id().

This might be helpful:

>>> a = []
>>> b = []
>>> id(a)
4299650400
>>> id(b)
4299730096
>>> a == b
True
>>> a is b
False

Also note this one:

>>> some_list = [0, 1, 2, 3, a]
>>> some_list.index(b)
4
>>> some_list[4] == b
True
>>> some_list[4] is b
False
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