Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to convert a string "00:11:22:33:44:55" to an uint8_t[6] representing a mac. I tried on my own, read somewhere char can be casted to uint8_t, but I'm kinda exhausted to try on my own. :(

Maybe there is a function in the kernel which does what I want.

If not, here is my code, what do I do wrong?

char * cleaned_mac =NULL;
char * extractMac(unsigned char * shared_user_buffer, size_t offset) {
    char * buffer = kmalloc(17, GFP_KERNEL);
    cleaned_mac = kmalloc(13, GFP_KERNEL);
    int i = 0;
    strncpy(buffer, shared_user_buffer + offset, 17);
    printk("BUFFER [%s]\n", buffer);
    while (*buffer && i < 12) {
        if (isxdigit(*buffer)) {
            printk("BUFFER [%c]\n", *buffer);
            cleaned_mac[i] = *buffer;
            printk("CLEANED BUFFER [%c]\n", *cleaned_mac);
            i++;
        }
        ++buffer;
    }
    cleaned_mac[12]=0x00;
    printk("CLEANED BUFFER [%s]\n", cleaned_mac);
    return cleaned_mac;
}

calling it like:

uint8_t * mac;
mac = extractMac(shared_user_buffer, strlen(tmq_server_prefix));
printk(KERN_DEBUG "MAC[%s]\n", mac);

printk(KERN_DEBUG "MAC[%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x]\n", mac[0], mac[1], mac[2], mac[3], mac[4], mac[5]);

so when I give "08:00:27:19:1f:02" in the function the result is:

Oct 13 17:41:28 client2 kernel: [ 1953.179271] CLEANED BUFFER [080027191f02]
Oct 13 17:41:28 client2 kernel: [ 1953.179273] MAC[080027191f02]
Oct 13 17:41:28 client2 kernel: [ 1953.179276] MAC[30:38:30:30:32:37]

So 08 became 30 and 38 ? Why is that?

Solution inspired from Dave (thank you):

uint8_t * cleaned_mac = NULL;
uint8_t * extractMac(unsigned char * shared_user_buffer, size_t offset) {
    char *c;
    char * buffer = kmalloc(17, GFP_KERNEL);
    int p = 0;
    const char * sep = ":";
    cleaned_mac = kmalloc(ETH_ALEN * sizeof(uint8_t), GFP_KERNEL);
    strncpy(buffer, shared_user_buffer + offset, 17);

    while ((c = strsep(&buffer, sep))) {
        cleaned_mac[p++] = simple_strtol(c, NULL, 16);
    }
    return cleaned_mac;
}

Usage then:

uint8_t *  mac;
mac = extractMac(shared_user_buffer, strlen(tmq_server_prefix));
        printk(KERN_DEBUG "---------------MAC [%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x]\n",
                mac[0], mac[1], mac[2], mac[3], mac[4], mac[5]);
share|improve this question
    
the ascii code for '0' is 0x30, and '8' is 0x38. You seem to be running your hex converter in reverse, and forgetting that characters use ascii. –  Chriszuma Oct 13 '11 at 15:47
    
yeah but it should be 08, so why is mac[0] interpreted as '0' and not 0x08 ? –  evildead Oct 13 '11 at 15:50
    
Honestly, I don't have the patience to understand what this extremely convoluted code is doing, but if mac is a character buffer containing "08:00:27:19:1f:02", then mac[0] will return '0'. I recommend reading about how strings work. –  Chriszuma Oct 13 '11 at 15:54
    
mac is an uint8_t * not a string. –  evildead Oct 13 '11 at 15:56
    
There is nearly no difference. Important is what is contained in the buffer: raw data oder data in hex representation? Obviously the latter. –  glglgl Oct 13 '11 at 16:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Tokenize the string, and call strtol on each result

char *c;
int p = 0;
for(c=strtok(buffer, ",");c;c=strtok(NULL, ","))
     mac[p++] = strtol(c, NULL, 16);
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't really work, since the MAC uses hexadecimal. atoi would give you the decimal interpretation, which is wrong. –  Chriszuma Oct 13 '11 at 15:59
    
Aah, I'll fix that with strtol –  Dave Oct 13 '11 at 16:00
    
c-'0' won't work for what appear to be hex digits. –  Chris Lutz Oct 13 '11 at 16:02
    
im in kernel, the functions you use are missng ther, but i got a solution. i post ist in my question. –  evildead Oct 13 '11 at 17:16

I can't decipher how your code is supposed to work, so I'll just write how I would do it:

char* macIn = "08:00:27:19:1f:02";
uint8_t macOut[6] = {0};

sscanf(macIn, "%2x:%2x:%2x:%2x:%2x:%2x", macOut, macOut+1, macOut+2, macOut+3, macOut+4, macOut+5);

printf("MAC IN: [%s]\n", macIn);
printf("MAC OUT (hex): [%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x:%02x]\n",
     macOut[0], macOut[1], macOut[2], macOut[3], macOut[4], macOut[5]);
printf("MAC OUT (decimal): [%02d:%02d:%02d:%02d:%02d:%02d]\n",
     macOut[0], macOut[1], macOut[2], macOut[3], macOut[4], macOut[5]);
share|improve this answer
    
didnt work. Printing was fine, but injecting it in an skb didn't work, was just garbage in there. –  evildead Oct 13 '11 at 17:22
    
wtf is an skb? If printing worked, then you're doing something else wrong. –  Chriszuma Oct 13 '11 at 17:23
    
FYI: ftp.gnumonks.org/pub/doc/skb-doc.html As I just saw I used a wrong pointer, your solution is fine also –  evildead Oct 13 '11 at 17:26

The %02x printf format interprets mac[0] as an integer, and prints it out as a string by converting it to two-digit hex.

Since mac[0] holds the ASCII character 0, whose ASCII code is 0x30, it's perfectly normal that you get the output you have.

share|improve this answer

You have to take every pair of characters, verify that the are really in the range '0'..'9', 'A'..'F' or 'a'..'f'. Then you take the first, map it to its "meaning" (0..15), multiply it with 16 and add the second one, mapped as well.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.