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If I change myfile("input.txt") to myfile(file_name)...where file_name is passed to the function it does not work but gives the error no matching function call..which I'm guessing b.c. I'm not suppose to be passing a string to the constructor...if not this way..how?

void file_to_string(string file_name)
{
   string line;  
   ifstream myfile("input.txt");
   if(myfile.is_open())
   {
      while(myfile.good())
      {
         getline(myfile,line);
         cout << line;
      }
      myfile.close();
  }
  else
  {
      cout << "File : " << file_name << " : did not open" ;
  }

}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    file_to_string(argv[1]);
}
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See my answer for some possible insights into this strange matter. I share your opinion. –  Christian Rau Oct 13 '11 at 16:14
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use the c_str() member of the std::string class:

ifstream myfile(file_name.c_str());

It returns a null-terminated const char * representation of the string in question, which is exactly what you need here.

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file_name is a std::string, but the ifstream constructor wants a plain C-style string (pointer to char). So just use:

iftsream myfile(file_name.c_str());

This is a rather unclean part of the library and IMHO due to the fact that the stream library is older than the STL (from which std::string was taken). So the stream library doesn't really know about std::string. This is also the reason for std::getline(std::istream&, std::string&) being a seperate function (and part of <string> rather than <istream> or something the like), I think.

One can see this as a clean separation of components, but I think std::string should be the standard for strings in C++ and therefore also be used by the stream library (at least its interface). And as the standard library is always to be seen as a whole, this is just a poor example of components working together cleanly. Maybe a future standard will address this.

EDIT: According to Benjamin's comment (and my reading through the standard draft) C++11 seems to indeed address this issue and you can now use a std::string as filename. But I guess you're not yet using C++11.

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1  
C++11 does in fact address this, and some library distros implement it now. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 13 '11 at 16:25
    
@BenjaminLindley Oh nice, I didn't know that. I'm not that fit in C++11 yet. Thanks for the info. –  Christian Rau Oct 13 '11 at 16:34
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The constructor of std::ifstream takes the file name as const char*. You can convert a std::string to a const char* by using the c_str() member function.

 void file_to_string(string file_name)
  {
  string line;  
  ifstream myfile(file_name.c_str()); //convert string to const char*
  if(myfile.is_open())
    {
    while(myfile.good())
      {
      getline(myfile,line);
      cout << line;
      }
    myfile.close();
    }
  else
    {
    cout << "File : " << file_name << " : did not open" ;
    }
  }
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
  {
  file_to_string(argv[1]);
  }
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ifstream takes a const char* as parameter, so you cannot pass a std::string to it. Maybe you could try:

 std::string fileName;
 ... // fill fileName
 ifstream myfile( fileName.c_str() );
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