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I am working with some MySQL statements that utilize joins. The performance for these queries seems to be rather poor and can take down the during the time in which the query is running. Listed below are a couple samples of the queries that I am using. I am new to MySQL JOIN statements and was curious if anyone could help me in optimizing these for better performance.

We use both of these to query our ticketing system database to generate some reports about the types of tickets handled, the location they were handled from, etc.

SELECT * FROM tickets t 
LEFT Join customfieldvalues cv1 ON t.ticketid = cv1.typeid 
LEFT Join customfields cf1 ON cv1.customfieldid = cf1.customfieldid 
LEFT Join customfieldoptions co1 on cv1.fieldvalue = co1.customfieldoptionid 
WHERE t.dateline BETWEEN 1314853200 AND 1317445199 
Group by t.ticketid 
Order by t.Dateline asc;

This one is the basic query (no filtering added) from Sep 1st to Sep 30th. Runtime ~140 sec. If you take away the three join lines, the run time is cut down to ~0.01 sec.

SELECT * FROM tickets t 
LEFT Join customfieldvalues cv1 ON t.ticketid = cv1.typeid 
LEFT Join customfields cf1 ON cv1.customfieldid = cf1.customfieldid 
LEFT Join customfieldoptions co1 on cv1.fieldvalue = co1.customfieldoptionid 
LEFT Join customfieldvalues cv2 ON cv1.typeid = cv2.typeid
LEFT Join customfields cf2 ON cv2.customfieldid = cf2.customfieldid
LEFT Join customfieldoptions co2 on cv2.fieldvalue = co2.customfieldoptionid
WHERE t.dateline BETWEEN 1314853200 AND 1317445199 
AND cf1.title ='Customer Type'  AND co1.optionvalue = 'Staff' 
And cf2.title ='Building or Hall' AND co2.optionvalue like '%Stroupe%' 
Group by t.ticketid 
Order by t.Dateline asc;

This query would be the basic query with 2 filters added: customer type (i.e. Staff) and the location Building or Hall (Stroupe). Using the same time frame as the one above, the run time is ~0.1 sec.

==============================

EDIT: Here is the output of the EXPLAIN command on the first query listed.

INSERT INTO `table_name` (`id`,`select_type`,`table`,`type`,`possible_keys`,`key`,`key_len`,`ref`,`rows`,`Extra`) VALUES (1,'SIMPLE','t','range','tickets7','tickets7','4',NULL,601,'Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort');
INSERT INTO `table_name` (`id`,`select_type`,`table`,`type`,`possible_keys`,`key`,`key_len`,`ref`,`rows`,`Extra`) VALUES (1,'SIMPLE','cv1','ALL',NULL,NULL,NULL,NULL,104679,'');
INSERT INTO `table_name` (`id`,`select_type`,`table`,`type`,`possible_keys`,`key`,`key_len`,`ref`,`rows`,`Extra`) VALUES (1,'SIMPLE','cf1','eq_ref','PRIMARY','PRIMARY','4','DB.cv1.customfieldid',1,'');
INSERT INTO `table_name` (`id`,`select_type`,`table`,`type`,`possible_keys`,`key`,`key_len`,`ref`,`rows`,`Extra`) VALUES (1,'SIMPLE','co1','eq_ref','PRIMARY','PRIMARY','4','DB.cv1.fieldvalue',1,'');

Here is the output of EXPLAIN from the second query.

id,select_type,table,type,possible_keys,key,key_len,ref,rows,Extra 1,SIMPLE,cf1,ref,"PRIMARY,title1",title1,767,const,1,"Using where; Using temporary; Using filesort" 1,SIMPLE,co1,ref,"PRIMARY,optionvalue1",optionvalue1,767,const,1,"Using where" 1,SIMPLE,cf2,ref,"PRIMARY,title1",title1,767,const,1,"Using where" 1,SIMPLE,t,range,"PRIMARY,tickets7,tickets15,tickets16",tickets7,4,NULL,601,"Using where" 1,SIMPLE,cv1,ref,customfieldvalues1,customfieldvalues1,8,"DB.cf1.customfieldid,DB.t.ticketid",1,"Using where" 1,SIMPLE,cv2,ref,customfieldvalues1,customfieldvalues1,8,"DB.cf2.customfieldid,DB.t.ticketid",1,"Using where" 1,SIMPLE,co2,eq_ref,PRIMARY,PRIMARY,4,DB.cv2.fieldvalue,1,"Using where"

share|improve this question
    
Have you created indexes on the columns involved in the JOIN operations? – Joe Stefanelli Oct 13 '11 at 16:52
    
@ Joe - I just looked and, yes, it appears that there are indexes on each of these. – John Oct 13 '11 at 16:59
1  
two things would help get better answers: table definition (so we can check there are indices on the columns we'd expect) and the output of EXPLAIN – Neville K Oct 13 '11 at 17:03
    
@ Neville - How do I create this information so that I can share it? – John Oct 13 '11 at 17:11
    
Add the word EXPLAIN before the query, run it, and show us the results. – Hammerite Oct 13 '11 at 17:12

Its the joins that are wrong your left join + where clause = inner join, you need to rewrite the query.

You are saying get me all of the rows from cf1 even if they do not exist and only the ones that have a title of 'Customer Type'.

If you change the left joins to inner joins it will be more performant, (although may not return what you want)

share|improve this answer
    
@ Kevin - Thanks for the ideas. I am still new at this. How do I create a query plan? Also, would an inner join be better here? I have added the two indexes (I think I did it right) as you suggest for title and optionvalue. – John Oct 13 '11 at 17:11
    
switching to inner joins would make more sense to the database in combination with your where clause, at the moment the 2 sections conflict. – Kevin Burton Oct 13 '11 at 17:35
    
Is there a formula to make sense of the join types. For example, you mention that an inner join is basically -- INNER JOIN = LEFT JOIN + WHERE CLAUSE ? Are there other such formulas for the other types? – John Oct 13 '11 at 22:00
    
not really a formula its a common mistake, that can lead to bad execution plans – Kevin Burton Oct 15 '11 at 6:43

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