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In a game I have a list of players, let's say like this:

LinkedList<String> players = new LinkedList<String>();

I want to let each player interact with each of the other players, so I write two nested loops:

Iterator<String> i1 = players.iterator();
while (i1.hasNext()) {
    String p1 = i1.next();
    Iterator<String> i2 = players.iterator();
    // But I want do this: Iterator<String> i2 = i1.clone();
    while (i2.hasNext()) {
        String p2 = i2.next();
        System.out.println("Interact: " + p1 + ", " + p2);
    }
}

Since I only want each pair of players to interact once, I want to start the inner loop with the player after the outer loop's current player. So I want to clone the iterator, but that doesn't compile.

So, what should I do instead?

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2  
Why not just use an ArrayList<String> instead? An algorithm using positions would be trivial with that data structure. –  Kirk Woll Oct 13 '11 at 17:47
    
Wouldn't this result in pairing player A with A? –  matt b Oct 13 '11 at 17:50
    
@Kirk: Yes, an ArrayList would work, but since I may have to insert and remove players in the middle of the list, I want a LinkedList. –  Thomas Padron-McCarthy Oct 13 '11 at 17:51
    
@matt b: Yes. Thankyou. Fixed (I hope). (This is what happens when I can't test my code. It is always wrong!) –  Thomas Padron-McCarthy Oct 13 '11 at 17:53
    
@Thomas, it's just that it's usually the case that reshuffling an array is faster than using a LinkedList since the cost of instantiating the list element entries is usually higher than simply moving memory around. –  Kirk Woll Oct 13 '11 at 17:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The following will do it:

ListIterator<String> i1 = players.listIterator(0);
while (i1.hasNext()) {
    String p1 = i1.next();
    ListIterator<String> i2 = players.listIterator(i1.nextIndex());
    while (i2.hasNext()) {
        String p2 = i2.next();
        System.out.println("Interact: " + p1 + ", " + p2);
    }
}

It relies on the ListIterator's ability to start from the given position and to also know its current position.

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1  
aix strikes again. +1, beautiful solution. –  aioobe Oct 13 '11 at 17:57
    
Thanks! But, one question: How does the listIterator(int) method work - it doesn't start at the head of the list and iterate its way to the given position, does it? –  Thomas Padron-McCarthy Oct 13 '11 at 19:31
1  
@ThomasPadron-McCarthy: That's not specified as part of the interface. However, given the nature of the linked list, at almost certainly does. On the other hand, I am not aware of any solution that would avoid this. –  NPE Oct 13 '11 at 19:44
    
@aix, +1 on your comment. There is one obvious solution however, if the OP is willing to go from O(1) to O(n) memory consumption, see my answer. –  aioobe Oct 19 '11 at 9:04
    
I ended up changing my LinkedList to an ArrayList. It may be a bit slower in other places, but at least I won't have the (mostly aesthetic) problem of unnecessary traversal. But I still don't understand why they decided not to let you clone the iterator. I even thought about using a purpose-built list, with clonable iterators, but I'll wait with that until I know I need the performance. –  Thomas Padron-McCarthy Oct 19 '11 at 14:52

In addition to aix answer, I'd like to point out that however you create an iterator starting at a specific index, it's bound to be a linear operation. If it wasn't, you would be able to do arbitrary access to the list in constant time using

elementN = createIterator(linkedList, N).next();

which would be contradictory.

In your situation I therefore believe that the most efficient solution would actually be to do

List<String> tmp = new ArrayList<String>(players);
for (int p1 = 0; p1 < tmp.size(); p1++)
    for (int p2 = p1+1; p2 < tmp.size(); p2++)
        System.out.println("Interact: " + tmp.get(p1) + ", " + tmp.get(p2));

Note however, that it is still the same complexity as the solution by aix; O(n2) but probably with a smaller constant factor.

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