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Good day guys.

I have the following struct and class,

template <class T>
struct Node
{
    T DataMember;
    Node* Next;
};

template <class T>
class NCA
{
    public:
        NCA();
        ~NCA();
        void push(T);
        T pop();
        void print();
        void Clear();
    private:
        Node<T>* Head;
        void* operator new(unsigned int);
};

I would like to instantiate the class with a size

ie. NCA[30] as one would any array

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If the compiler were to allow you to use brackets in your object constructor, how would it know whether you were trying to make an NCA of size 30 or an array of 30 NCA objects? C++ does not allow you to override the bracket syntax, except as an operator once you already have an object.

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You can't. But, you can do something almost like that: initialize it with parenthesis, but not brackets:

NCA<int> myList(30);

Implement it like so:

template <class T>
class NCA
{
  ...
  public:
    explicit NCA(std::size_t count);
  ...
 };

template <class T>
NCA<T>::NCA(std::size_t count) {
  ... allocate Head, &c ...
  while(count--)
    push(T());
}
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3  
The constructor should be explicit to avoid automatic conversion of size_t to NCA. –  reima Oct 13 '11 at 18:51
    
Thanks, @reima. –  Robᵩ Oct 13 '11 at 19:19

That's not quite how operator[] works.

When you write NCA[30] you're writing type[30], where as to use operator[] you need an instance:

NCA inst;
inst[30];

What you can do though is use an integer template parameter to specify the size, e.g.:

#include <utility>

template <std::size_t N>
class NCA {
  char bytes[N];
};

int main() {
  NCA<1024> instance;
}
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To Everyone: I apologize - awoodland is absolutely right - i meant NCA nca[30] then use nca –  Aiden Strydom Oct 13 '11 at 18:49

You can't.

You can only use the ctor to do it like:

NCA n(30);
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Thank you all - sigh it saddens my heart. I really wanted to do this.... I'll then just have to take compiler construction in Honours and then fix this little bug :) –  Aiden Strydom Oct 13 '11 at 19:06

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