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Should I write unit test for all nested methods or if writing one test for caller is enough?

For instance:

void Main()
{
    var x = new A().AFoo();
}

public class A
{
    public int AFoo()
    {        
        // some logic
        var x = new B().BFoo();

        // might have some logic

        return x;
    }
}

public class B
{
    public int BFoo()
    {
        // some logic
        return ???;
    }
}

Is that sufficient to write unit test for Main() method or I need to write tests for Main, A.AFoo(), B.BFoo() methods? How deep should I go?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unit tests are supposed to work on units, in the case of OOP the units are classes and the methods of the classes. That means that you should write a separate test class for each class under consideration, and at least one testing method for each method provided in the class. What is more, it is important to isolate the classes as much as possible so that a bug in class B does not cause a failure on class A. This is why Inversion of Control (Dependency Injection) is so useful, because if you can inject the instance of class B into the instance of class A, you can change B to be just a Mock object.

One of the reasons we write unit tests is to explain, in code, exactly how the methods of each class are expected to behave under all conditions, including and especially edge cases. It is hard to detail the expected behaviour of class B by writing tests on the main method.

I would recommend reading some material online explaining test driven development and how to mock objects, and perhaps use some of the excellent mocking libraries that exist such as JMock. See this question for more links.

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A testing purist would say that you need to create unit tests for classes A and B.

Each class should have all methods tested. If a method can do more than one thing (if you have an if statement, for example), then you should have a test for each path. If the tests are getting too complicated, it's probably a good idea to refactor the code to make the tests simpler.

Note as it stands right now, its hard to test A in isolation because it depends on B. If B is simple, as it is right now, it's probably ok. You might want to name your tests for A integration tests because technically they test both A and B together. Another option would be to have the method AFoo accept as a parameter the instance of B on which it operates. That way you could mock an instance of B and have a true unit test.

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Thanks for reply. I agree that all if needs to be tested and all methods needs to be tested, but I found some cases where one method (Main) calls another method and testing Main with all scenarios, then I repeat all those scenarios in class A.AFoo and then same scenarios in class B.BFoo. –  Vlad Bezden Oct 13 '11 at 19:05
1  
@vlad, every class should have its own tests. –  hvgotcodes Oct 13 '11 at 19:08
1  
@hvgotcodes - I'd correct that a bit. Every '''public''' type should have its own tests. –  Gishu Oct 14 '11 at 5:45

Unit tests should help you to reduce your debugging effort. So when you just write unit tests for AFoo and none for BFoo, and one of your test fails, you probably won't know if the problem is part of class A or class B. Writing tests for BFoo too will help you to isolate the error in smaller amount of time.

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