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I did change the datadir of a MySQL installation and following some steps it worked fine. Every base I had was moved correctly but one.

I can connect and USE the database, even SHOW TABLES returns me all the tables correctly and the files of each table exists on the mysql data directory. But when I try to SELECT something there, it says the table doesn't exists. But the table does exists, it even shows at SHOW TABLES statement!

My guess is that the SHOW TABLES lists the files existence somehow that the files are corrupt or something like that but it doesn't check it. So I can list them but not access them.

But that's just a guess, I've never seen this before. Can't restart the database now for testing, every other application which uses it is running fine.

Does anyone knows what is it?

Example:

mysql> SHOW TABLES;
+-----------------------+
| Tables_in_database    |
+-----------------------+
| TABLE_ONE             |
| TABLE_TWO             |
| TABLE_THREE           |
+-----------------------+
mysql> SELECT * FROM TABLE_ONE;
ERROR 1146 (42S02): Table 'database.TABLE_ONE' doesn't exist
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have you restore the database from a backup? or you just copied the db files? do you have root access to the mysql server? –  alinoz Oct 13 '11 at 19:15
    
just copied the files! yes i have root access to everything –  johnsmith Oct 13 '11 at 19:19
    
can you try: mysql_fix_privilege_tables –  alinoz Oct 13 '11 at 19:24
    
I will, but I'll have to restart the server after that, right? Just cant do it now :s –  johnsmith Oct 13 '11 at 19:31
3  
are these innodb tables? –  Paul Dixon Oct 13 '11 at 20:02

20 Answers 20

Just in case anyone still cares:

I had the same issue after copying a database directory directly using command

cp -r /path/to/my/database /var/lib/mysql/new_database

If you do this with a database that uses InnoDB tables, you will get this crazy 'table does not exist' error mentioned above.

The issue is that you need the ib* files in the root of the MySQL datadir (e.g. ibdata1, ib_logfile0 ib_logfile1).

When I copied those it worked for me.

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5  
Saved my life! For anyone else just be sure not to overwrite the existing ib* files if you're trying to copy to a new installation. Backup your existing mysql/ directory, replace with the old one you want to recover, mysqldump everything, then restore the fresh mysql/. Then you can import the mysqldumps properly. –  Matthew Nov 15 '12 at 22:13
    
Thank you! I owe you one! –  Ivan Nikolchov Dec 14 '12 at 22:34
    
On Mac to replicate my database locally, in addition to copying over the ibdata file (located next to the database dir) I had to chown _mysql:wheel the databasename dir, ibdata and all files in the dir (use chown -R ...). Similarly, the permissions were incorrect inside the dir so chmod -R 660 databasename was needed to get tables to show up in the datatbase. –  Dylan Valade Dec 15 '12 at 21:13
    
Thanks Mike. Just to clarify you will need to restart the mysql service to get this working. At least I did, and thank goodness it worked. A lot of data saved there! –  Nick Martin Mar 31 '13 at 0:52
2  
NOTE: Do not forget to use chown!!! So, all after cp use this command -> chown mysql:mysql /var/lib/mysql/ -R –  Qeremy May 11 at 3:14

For me on Mac OS (MySQL DMG Installation) a simple restart of the MySQL-Server solved the problem. I am guessing the hibernation caused it.

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+1 Worked for me –  cillosis Mar 17 at 22:01
    
Thanks that really helped! –  cusquinho Apr 21 at 22:35
    
Worked for me too. –  rsman May 1 at 10:04
    
Thanks fixed the same issue for me as well. Mine happened after my machine shut down due to a sudden power loss. After the first machine restart/MySQL startup, I got the error. Then, I read this answer. I stopped/started MySQL through System Preferences and it was fixed. –  jeff303 Jun 11 at 15:19

I get this issue when the case for the table name I'm using is off. So table is called 'db' but I used 'DB' in select statement. Make sure the case is the same.

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1  
+1 Field names aren't case sensitive, but table names are. Common mistake, and very annoying. –  GolezTrol Oct 13 '11 at 19:15
1  
tried both ways! –  johnsmith Oct 13 '11 at 19:18
    
This was exactly what I ran into. +1 –  meddlingwithfire Nov 15 '12 at 21:10
  1. stop mysqld
  2. backup mysql folder: cp -a /var/lib/mysql /var/lib/mysql-backup
  3. copy database folder from old machine to /var/lib/mysql
  4. override ib* (ib_logfile* , ibdata ) from old database
  5. start mysqld
  6. dump dabase
  7. mysqldump >dbase.mysql
  8. stop mysql service
  9. remove /var/log/mysql
  10. rename /var/lib/mysql-backup to /var/lib/mysql
  11. start mysqld
  12. create the database
  13. mysqldump < dbase.mysql
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In my case, I also had to do: 10.5 delete the <db_name> directory from under /var/lib/mysql/ –  Tony the Tech Sep 19 at 3:42

I have just spend 3 days on this nightmare. Ideally.. you have a backup and can restore... Then DROP THE DAMAGED TABLE. These sorts of errors can cause your ibdata1 to grow HUGE (100GBs in size for modest tables.)

If you don't have a recent backup (if you relied on mysqldump then you backups probably silently broke at some point in the past) then you need to export the databases.. which of course you cant do you will get lock errors running mysqldump.

so.. Go to /var/log/mysql/database_name/ and remove the table_name.*

Then immediately try to dump the table.. this should now work. Now restore the database to a new database and rebuild the missing table(s). Then dump the broken database.

In our case we were also constantly getting mysql has gone away messages at random on all databases. Once the damaged database were removed everything went back to normal.

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Thanks Andy, I got a clue for problem I am facing. I moved the ibdata1 from somehwere in C drive to D drive in order to save space crunch over C drive. Thankfully I got the ibdata1 (along with ib_logfile1. and ib_logfile0 file) in my D drive after reading your comments. Now will look from where I moved these file and restore it there. Then hopefully my tables will came back. –  AKS Mar 3 at 17:01

Please run the query:

SELECT 
    i.TABLE_NAME AS table_name, 
    LENGTH(i.TABLE_NAME) AS table_name_length,
    IF(i.TABLE_NAME RLIKE '^[A-Za-z0-9_]+$','YES','NO') AS table_name_is_ascii
FROM
    information_schema.`TABLES` i
WHERE
    i.TABLE_SCHEMA = 'database'

Unfortunately MySQL allows unicode and non-printable characters to be used in table name. If you created your tables by copying create code from some document/website, there is a chance that it has zero-width-space somewhere.

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very useful post, thanks! but all tables are ASCII with correct name length –  johnsmith Oct 13 '11 at 20:12

Its possible you have a hidden character in your table name. Those don't show up when you do a show tables. Can you do a "SHOW CREATE TABLE TABLE_ONE" and tab complete the "TABLE_ONE" and see if it puts in any hidden characters. Also, have you tried dropping and remaking the tables. Just to make sure nothing is wrong with the privileges and that there are no hidden characters.

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tab completing doesnt help and I cant show create table because table "doesnt exists". from the hell –  johnsmith Oct 13 '11 at 20:13

What worked for me, was just dropping the table, even though it didnt exist. Then I re created the table and repopulated from an sql dump done previously.

There must be some metabase of table names, and it was most likely still existing in there till i dropped it.

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Try to run sql query to discard tablespace before coping idb-file:

ALTER TABLE mydatabase.mytable DISCARD TABLESPACE;

Copy idb-file

ALTER TABLE mydatabase.mytable IMPORT TABLESPACE;

Restart MySql

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Had a similar problem with a ghost table. Thankfully had an SQL dump from before the failure.

In my case, I had to:

  1. Stop mySQL
  2. Move ib* files from /var/mysql off to a backup
  3. Delete /var/mysql/{dbname}
  4. Restart mySQL
  5. Recreate empty database
  6. Restore dump file

NOTE: Requires dump file.

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This error can also occur when setting lower_case_table_names to 1, and then trying to access tables that were created with the default value for that variable. In that case you can revert it to the previous value and you will be able to read the table.

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O.k. this is going to sound pretty absurd, but humor me.
For me the problem got resolved when I changed by statement to this :

SELECT * FROM `table`

I made two changes 1.) Made the table name lower case - I know !! 2.) Used the specific quote symbol = ` : It's the key above your TAB

The solution does sound absurd, but it worked and it's Saturday evening and I've been working since 9 a.m. - So I'll take it :)

Good luck.

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Just FYI - The table is MyISAMand not INNO –  PlanetUnknown Dec 13 at 22:56

After having to reinstall MySQL I had this same problem, it seems that during the install, some configuration files that store data about the InnoDB log files, these files ib_logfile* (they are log files right?), are overwriten. To solve this problem I just deleted the ib_logfile* files.

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I had the same problem, but it wasn't due to a hidden character or "schroedinger's table". The problem (exactly as noted above) appeared after a restore process. I'm using MySQL administrator version 1.2.16. When a restore has to be carried out, you must have unchecked ORIGINAL at the target schema and select the name of your data base from the drop box. After that the problem was fixed. At least that was the reason in my database.

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I my case it was SQLCA.DBParm parameter.

I used SQLCA.DBParm = "Databse = "sle_database.text"" but it must be SQLCA.DBParm = "Database='" +sle_database.text+ "'"

Explain : you are going to combine three strings :

  1. Database=' - "Database='"

  2. (name of the database) - +sle_database.text+

  3. ' - "'" (means " ' " without space)

Don't use spaces in quatermarks. Thank to my colleague Jan.

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I installed MariaDB on new computer, stopped Mysql service renamed data folder to data- I solved my problem copying just Mysql\data\table_folders and ibdata1 from crashed HD MySql data Folder to the new installed mysql data folder.

I Skipped ib_logfile0 and ib_logfile1 (otherwise the server did not start service)

Started mysql service.

Then server is running.

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Same exact problem after TimeMachine backup import. My solution was to stop the MySQL server and fix read-write permissions on the ib* files.

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It appears that the issue has to do (at least in mine and a few others) with invalid (corrupt?) innodb log files. Generally speaking, they simply need to be recreated.

Here are solutions, most of which require a restart of mysql.

  • Recreate your log files (Delete and restart mysql)
  • Resize your log files (MySql 5.6+ will regenerate the file for you)
  • If you are doing some type of a data migration, make sure you have correctly migrated the right file and given it permissions as others have already stated
  • Check permissions of your data and log files, that mysql is owner of both
  • If all else fails, you will likely have to recreate the database
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One other answer I think is worth bringing up here (because I came here with that same problem and this turned out to be the answer for me):

Double check that the table name in your query is spelled exactly the same as it is in the database.

Kind of an obvious, newbie thing, but things like "user" vs "users" can trip people up and I thought it would be a helpful answer to have in the list here. :)

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If there's a period in the table name, it will fail for SELECT * FROM poorly_named.table;

Use backticks to get it to find the table SELECT * FROM `poorly_named.table`;

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