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I am currently using Backbone.js collection and View and I am attempting to bind a collections function to a function inside of the view. I thought that I could simply create a function inside of the collection and then bind it inside of the view. Unfortunately, it keeps referencing the collections method. Here is my code.

var RightPaneCollectionView = Backbone.View.extend({
    initialize: function(){
        _.bindAll(this, 'render', 'add', 'remove', 'remove_by_name');   // bind the methods to this scope
        this.el.html("");   // clear out the view
        this.collection.bind('removeByName', this.remove_by_name);
                    this.collection.bind('remove', this.remove);
    },
    remove_by_name: function(){ console.log("Removing by name inside view.")
    }
}

var RightPaneCollection = Backbone.Collection.extend({
   model: RightPaneButtonModel,
url: "",
removeByName: function(){
    console.log("Removing by name inside collection");
}
});

I'd like to be able to do the falling

 rightPaneCollection.removeByName("foo");

and have it reference the view. I'm not sure I'm going about this in the correct manner. Currently the remove works correctly by referencing the remove method inside of the view.

Thanks for you help!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is this what you are looking for?

Basically, I am triggering a "removeByName" event from the collection when the item is removed and I pass the name of the item that was removed. In the View, I am binding to that event name and calling the view's function and accessing the name of the item being removed.

var RightPaneCollectionView = Backbone.View.extend({
    initialize: function(){
        _.bindAll(this, 'remove_by_name');
        this.el.html("");   // clear out the view
        this.collection.bind('removeByName', this.remove_by_name);
    },
    remove_by_name: function(name){ 
        console.log("Removing by name inside view: " + name)
    }
}

var RightPaneCollection = Backbone.Collection.extend({
   model: RightPaneButtonModel,
   url: "",
   removeByName: function(name){
       var itemToRemove = this.find(function(item){return item.get("name") === name;});
       if(itemToRemove) {
           this.remove(itemToRemove);
           this.trigger("removeByName", name);
       }
   }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Not quite, I'm trying to bind a function inside of the collection to a function inside of the view. For instance, you can do this.collection.bind('remove', this.remove); and then when instanceOfCollection gets called it references the remove method inside of the view as opposed to the collection. –  Phillip Whisenhunt Oct 13 '11 at 21:46
    
@PhillipWhisenhunt I think you are confused. When you call collection.bind("remove", this.remove) you are not binding to the remove function of the collection, but the "remove" event that the remove function triggers. Notice how the _remove implementation works. It calls trigger("remove", ...). So, in my example, I implement removeByName and then trigger the "removeByName" event which I then bind to in the view. Does that make sense? –  Brian Genisio Oct 13 '11 at 22:44
    
O, that makes a lot more sense. Yeah, I thought it was binding to the remove function. Thank you so much for your help! –  Phillip Whisenhunt Oct 14 '11 at 0:24

I'm not certain, but don't you have to manually trigger the event?

var RightPaneCollection = Backbone.Collection.extend({
    model: RightPaneButtonModel,
    url: "",
    removeByName: function(){
        console.log("Removing by name inside collection");
        this.trigger('removeByName');
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that is correct. That is what I have in my example... triggering the event after the item has been removed. You can then bind to that event from anywhere. You don't bind to functions in Backbone, but you do bind to events... so you need to trigger them if you want them to be fired. –  Brian Genisio Oct 13 '11 at 22:47

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