Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm doing a project that involves comparing programming languages. I'm computing the Ackermann function. I tested Java, Python, and Ruby, and got responses between 10 and 30 milliseconds. But C++ seems to take 125 milliseconds. Is this normal, or is it a problem with the gettimeofday()? Gettimeofday() is in time.h.

I'm testing on a (virtual) Ubuntu Natty Narwhal 32-bit. I'm not short processing power (Quad-core 2.13 GHz Intel Xeon).

My code is here:

#include <iostream>
#include <sys/time.h>
using namespace std;
int a(int m,int n) {
    if (m == 0) {
    return n + 1;
    } else if (m > 0 and n == 0) {
    return a(m-1,1);
    } else if (m > 0 and n > 0) {
    return a(m-1,a(m,n-1));
    }
}

int main() {
    timeval tim;
    gettimeofday(&tim,NULL);
    double t1 = tim.tv_usec;
    int v = a(3,4);           
    gettimeofday(&tim,NULL);
    double t2 = tim.tv_usec;
    cout << v << endl << t2-t1;
    return 0;
}       
share|improve this question
1  
What platform are you running on? And what actual code are you using to take the measurement? –  Clare Macrae Oct 13 '11 at 22:03
    
How did you test this? –  Foo Bah Oct 13 '11 at 22:03
    
Could you at least show us your code to see how you are doing it? –  K-ballo Oct 13 '11 at 22:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming you're talking about the resolution of the data returned (a), the POSIX specification for gettimeofday states:

The resolution of the system clock is unspecified.

This is due to the fact that systems may have a widely varying capacity for tracking small time periods. Even the ISO standard clock() function includes caveats like this.

If you're talking about how long it takes to call it (a), the standard makes no guarantees about performance along those lines. An implementation is perfectly free to wait 125 minutes before giving you the time although I doubt such an implementation would have much market success :-)

As an example of the limited resolution, I typed in the following code to check it:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/time.h>

#define NUMBER 30

int main (void) {
    struct timeval tv[NUMBER];
    int count[NUMBER], i, diff;

    gettimeofday (&tv[0], NULL);

    for (i = 1; i < NUMBER; i++) {
        gettimeofday (&tv[i], NULL);
        count[i] = 1;
        while ((tv[i].tv_sec == tv[i-1].tv_sec) &&
            (tv[i].tv_usec == tv[i-1].tv_usec))
        {
            gettimeofday (&tv[i], NULL);
            count[i]++;
        }
    }

    printf ("%2d: secs = %d, usecs = %6d\n", 0, tv[0].tv_sec, tv[0].tv_usec);
    for (i = 1; i < NUMBER; i++) {
        diff = (tv[i].tv_sec - tv[i-1].tv_sec) * 1000000;
        diff += tv[i].tv_usec - tv[i-1].tv_usec;

        printf ("%2d: secs = %d, usecs = %6d, count = %5d, diff = %d\n",
            i, tv[i].tv_sec, tv[i].tv_usec, count[i], diff);
    }

    return 0;
}

The code basically records the changes in the underlying time, keeping a count of how many calls it took to gettimeofday() for the time to actually change. This is on my new i7 grunter laptop so it's not short on processing power (the count indicates how often it was able to call gettimeofday() for each time quantum, aound the 5,000 mark).

The output was:

 0: secs = 1318554836, usecs = 990820
 1: secs = 1318554836, usecs = 991820, count =  5129, diff = 1000
 2: secs = 1318554836, usecs = 992820, count =  5807, diff = 1000
 3: secs = 1318554836, usecs = 993820, count =  5901, diff = 1000
 4: secs = 1318554836, usecs = 994820, count =  5916, diff = 1000
 5: secs = 1318554836, usecs = 995820, count =  5925, diff = 1000
 6: secs = 1318554836, usecs = 996820, count =  5814, diff = 1000
 7: secs = 1318554836, usecs = 997820, count =  5814, diff = 1000
 8: secs = 1318554836, usecs = 998820, count =  5819, diff = 1000
 9: secs = 1318554836, usecs = 999820, count =  5901, diff = 1000
10: secs = 1318554837, usecs =    820, count =  5815, diff = 1000
11: secs = 1318554837, usecs =   1820, count =  5866, diff = 1000
12: secs = 1318554837, usecs =   2820, count =  5849, diff = 1000
13: secs = 1318554837, usecs =   3820, count =  5857, diff = 1000
14: secs = 1318554837, usecs =   4820, count =  5867, diff = 1000
15: secs = 1318554837, usecs =   5820, count =  5852, diff = 1000
16: secs = 1318554837, usecs =   6820, count =  5865, diff = 1000
17: secs = 1318554837, usecs =   7820, count =  5867, diff = 1000
18: secs = 1318554837, usecs =   8820, count =  5885, diff = 1000
19: secs = 1318554837, usecs =   9820, count =  5864, diff = 1000
20: secs = 1318554837, usecs =  10820, count =  5918, diff = 1000
21: secs = 1318554837, usecs =  11820, count =  5869, diff = 1000
22: secs = 1318554837, usecs =  12820, count =  5866, diff = 1000
23: secs = 1318554837, usecs =  13820, count =  5875, diff = 1000
24: secs = 1318554837, usecs =  14820, count =  5925, diff = 1000
25: secs = 1318554837, usecs =  15820, count =  5870, diff = 1000
26: secs = 1318554837, usecs =  16820, count =  5877, diff = 1000
27: secs = 1318554837, usecs =  17820, count =  5868, diff = 1000
28: secs = 1318554837, usecs =  18820, count =  5874, diff = 1000
29: secs = 1318554837, usecs =  19820, count =  5862, diff = 1000

showing that the resolution seems to be limited to no better than one thousand microseconds. Of course, your system may be different to that, the bottom line is that it depends on your implementation and/or environment.


(a) If you're talking about something else that I haven't thought of, you should probably flesh out your question with a little more detail. We're pretty good here on SO, but we're not omniscient.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.