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I'm exploring annotations and came to a point where some annotations seems to have a hierarchy among them.

I'm using annotations to generate code in the background for Cards. There are different Card types (thus different code and annotations) but there are certain elements that are common among them like a name.

@Target(value = {ElementType.TYPE})
public @interface Move extends Page{
 String method1();
 String method2();
}

And this would be the common Annotation:

@Target(value = {ElementType.TYPE})
public @interface Page{
 String method3();
}

In the example above I would expect Move to inherit method3 but I get a warning saying that extends is not valid with annotations. I was trying to have an Annotation extends a common base one but that doesn't work. Is that even possible or is just a design issue?

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Annotation inheritance seems like a must-have for creating a DSL based on annotations. Such a pity that annotation inheritance is not supported. –  Ceki Apr 15 '13 at 19:09
    
I agree, seems like a natural thing to do. Especially after to understand inheritance on Java, you kind of expect it to apply to everything. –  javydreamercsw Apr 15 '13 at 19:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, no. Apparently it has something to do with programs that read the annotations on a class without loading them all the way. See Why is not possible to extend annotations in Java?

However, types do inherit the annotations of their superclass if those annotations are @Inherited.

Also, unless you need those methods to interact, you could just stack the annotations on your class:

@Move
@Page
public class myAwesomeClass {}

Is there some reason that wouldn't work for you?

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1  
That was what I thought but I was trying to simplify things. Maybe applying the Common one to an abstract class would do the trick... –  javydreamercsw Oct 14 '11 at 2:16
1  
Yeah, that looked pretty clever too. Good luck! –  andronikus Oct 14 '11 at 2:27

You can annotate your annotation with base annotation instead of inheritance.

E.g. this is used in Spring framework:

@Target({ElementType.FIELD, ElementType.PARAMETER})
@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Qualifier
public @interface MovieQualifier {

  String genre();

  Format format();
}

In your case code will look like:

@Target(value = {ElementType.TYPE})
@Page(method3="someValue")
public @interface Move {
 String method1();
 String method2();
}

@Target(value = {ElementType.ANNOTATION_TYPE})
public @interface Page{
 String method3();
}
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9  
Please include an explanation of how to process such annotations. –  Aleksandr Dubinsky Dec 4 '13 at 10:16

In addition to Grygoriys answer of annotating annotations.

You can check e.g. methods for containing a @Qualifier annotation (or an annotation annotated with @Qualifier) by this loop:

for (Annotation a : Lists.newArrayList(method.getAnnotations())) {
    if (a.annotationType().isAnnotationPresent(Qualifier.class)) {
        System.out.println("found @Qualifier annotation");//found annotation having Qualifier annotation itself
    }
}

What you're basically doing, is to get all annotations present on the method and of those annotations you get their types and check those types if they're annotated with @Qualifier. Your annotation needs to be Target.Annotation_type enabled as well to get this working.

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