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From Python Problem Set The three functions work correctly but they require executing one at a time before moving to the next in order to get the final result. Is there a way to obtain the result from all three without having to query each one individually?

>>> import itertools

>>> def prime_factors(value):
    if value > 3:
        for this in itertools.chain(iter([2]), xrange(3,int(value ** 0.5)+1, 2)):
            if this*this > value:  break
            while not (value % this):
                if value == this: break
                value /=  this
                yield this
    yield value

>>> prime_factors(315)
generator object prime_factors at 0x01182468>

>>> def prime_factors_mult(n):
    res = list(prime_factors(n))
    return sorted([fact, res.count(fact)] for fact in set(res))

>>> prime_factors_mult(315)
[[3, 2], [5, 1], [7, 1]]

>>> def totient(n):
    from operator import mul
    if n == 1: return 1
    return reduce(mul, [(p-1) * p**(m-1) for p,m in prime_factors_mult(n)])

>>> totient(315)
144
share|improve this question
    
Not exactly sure what you mean by "obtain the result from all three without having to query each one individually". Do you mean calling all three in sequence? If so, you can create a function that calls the three of them, and returns an array (for instance), with the results. Did I miss the point? –  pcalcao Oct 13 '11 at 23:40
    
Wait, is this the Euler totient (phi) function? –  Blender Oct 13 '11 at 23:49
    
First thing I'd do would be caching a list of prime numbers, extending it if larger primes are needed. This would speed up calls to prime_factors significantly, and probably would speed things up if you need only one totient value. –  9000 Oct 13 '11 at 23:58
    
@pcalcao That might work, have an example? –  Astron Oct 14 '11 at 0:02
1  
@Astron: yes, caching prime numbers in a Python list (word 'array' is rarely used). Add a function find_primes(maximum) and use find_primes(value**0.5) in prime_factors. The find_primes will consult a global list of primes; if list's last value is less than maximum, it will generate enough primes using Eratosthenes method and append them to the primes list. Initially the list of primes would be just [2], though you could supply more :) The lookup will speed up subsequent calculation of totient. –  9000 Oct 14 '11 at 0:18
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can combine the second 2, but the generator should stay a generator:

In [1]: import itertools
In [2]: from operator import mul

In [3]: def prime_factors(value):
            if value > 3:
                for this in itertools.chain(iter([2]), xrange(3,int(value ** 0.5) + 1, 2)):
                    if (this * this) > value:
                        break
                    while not (value % this):
                        if value == this:
                            break
                        value /= this
                        yield this
            yield value

In [4]: def totient(n):
            if n != 1:
                res = list(prime_factors(n))
                prime_factors_mult = sorted([fact, res.count(fact)] for fact in set(res))
                retValue = reduce(mul, [(p-1) * p**(m-1) for p,m in prime_factors_mult]), prime_factors_mult
            else:
                retValue = n
            return retValue

In [5]: x = totient(315)

In [6]: print x
(144, [[3, 2], [5, 1], [7, 1]])

In [7]: print x[0]
144

In [8]: print x[1]
[[3, 2], [5, 1], [7, 1]]

You actually can combine all 3 and have the 1 function return a 3-tuple of what each ones return value would be:

import itertools
from operator import mul

def totient(n):
    if n == 1:  return 1
    res = list()
    value = int("%d" % n)
    if value > 3:
        for this in itertools.chain(iter([2]), xrange(3,int(value ** 0.5)+1, 2)):
            if this*this > value:  break
            while not (value % this):
                if value == this:  break
                value /= this
                res.append(this)
    res.append(value)
    prime_factors_mult = sorted([fact, res.count(fact)] for fact in set(res))
    return res, reduce(mul, [(p - 1) * p**(m - 1) for p,m in prime_factors_mult]), prime_factors_mult

x = totient(315)

# This would be the returned list from prime_factors(315)
print x[0]
[3, 3, 5, 7]

# This would be the returned value from totient(315)
print x[1]
144

# This would be the returned list from prime_factors_mult(315)
print x[2]
[[3, 2], [5, 1], [7, 1]]

# The 3-tuple:
print x
([3, 3, 5, 7], 144, [[3, 2], [5, 1], [7, 1]])
share|improve this answer
    
Can the prime factors still be returned from the original prime_factors_mult in the totient function? –  Astron Oct 14 '11 at 0:13
    
@Astron check my edits, I made it into 1 single function that returns a 3-tuple of what each function alone would have returned ([3, 3, 5, 7], 144, [[3, 2], [5, 1], [7, 1]]). –  chown Oct 14 '11 at 0:45
    
Thanks for the quick answer! –  Astron Oct 14 '11 at 0:49
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