Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a wcf service serving images, these images are volatile and regularly updated. I display them on a webpage using an img tag

<img src="location/map/image/{coordinates} 

cordinates is a number e.g. 12786. In my javascript I create and remove the image tag at different times. I have used the following code to add HTTP headers to prevent caching

    //whatever the result we will not cache this at the client or intermediate proxies
    HttpContext.Current.Response.ClearHeaders();
    HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Cache-Control", "no-cache"); //HTTP 1.1
    HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Cache-Control", "private"); // HTTP 1.1
    HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Cache-Control", "no-store"); // HTTP 1.1
    HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Cache-Control", "must-revalidate"); // HTTP 1.1
    HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Cache-Control", "max-stale=0"); // HTTP 1.1 
    HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Cache-Control", "post-check=0"); // HTTP 1.1 
    HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Cache-Control", "pre-check=0"); // HTTP 1.1 
    HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Pragma", "no-cache"); // HTTP 1.1 
    HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Keep-Alive", "timeout=3, max=993"); // HTTP 1.1 
    HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Expires", "Mon, 26 Jul 1997 05:00:00 GMT"); // HTTP 1.1 
    //write the image http response

I have noticed that in firefox the image is never refeshed and resorted to adding a dummy query string parameter. I have come to understand that firefox DOM will notice that the image url has been used before on the same page and won't refresh it.

This seems to be completely against Http(REST) since the image is not linked to the document in anyway and is a seperate HTTP resource why should it's accessibility be determined by the page/DOM it is referrenced in.

This is completely against HTTP.

My question is; is there a way of preventing this behaviour in firefox using HTTP? Please don't say Response.HttpContext.Current.Response.Cache.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.NoCache); it doesn't work on FF.

I am using FF6.

share|improve this question
    
This may help you: stackoverflow.com/questions/5063338/… –  Al Kepp Oct 14 '11 at 0:16
    
using a handler is much the same as using a service cos I can do all the same things in both so the above won't solve my issue at all. –  smoothe Oct 14 '11 at 0:23
add comment

2 Answers

Try adding the following:

HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Pragma", "no-cache"); 
HttpContext.Current.Response.AppendHeader("Cache-Control", "no-cache");

HttpContext.Current.Response.CacheControl = "no-cache"; 
HttpContext.Current.Response.Expires = -1;

HttpContext.Current.response.ExpiresAbsolute = new DateTime(1900, 1, 1); 
HttpContext.Current.response.Cache.SetCacheability(HttpCacheability.NoCache);
share|improve this answer
    
Works on IE, Chrome but not FF –  smoothe Oct 14 '11 at 0:26
    
Then there is no way that setting variables on the server is going to work. If FF won't play fair then I would append the current timestamp to the request. (but as I recall I had this problem in IE7) –  RBZ Oct 14 '11 at 2:07
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok I need to close this and the result is FF needs to be fixed, I will add a bug on the FF website.

Thanks to everyone who answered and looked at this question hopefully this will help some googler in future.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.