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I keep getting the following errors when I compile under g++ (These are segments of a much longer code)


error: invalid use of incomplete type 'const struct cmp_bk(const void*, const void*)::bk'

error: forward declaration of 'const struct cmp_bk(const void*, const void*)::bk'

The Code is as follows:

static union {
    struct tt {                     /* Transposition table entry */
            unsigned short hash;    /* - Identifies position */
            short move;             /* - Best recorded move */
            short score;            /* - Score */
            char flag;              /* - How to interpret score */
            char depth;             /* - Remaining search depth */
    } tt[CORE];
    struct bk {                     /* Opening book entry */
            unsigned long hash;     /* - Identifies position */
            short move;             /* - Move for this position */
            unsigned short count;   /* - Frequency */
    } bk[CORE];
} core;

Later on in the program, we define new structs a, b

static int cmp_bk(const void *ap, const void *bp)
{
    const struct bk *a = (bk*) ap;
    const struct bk *b = (bk*) bp;

    if (a->hash < b->hash) return -1;
    if (a->hash > b->hash) return 1;
    return (int)a->move - (int)b->move;

}

We're possibly(?) having trouble accessing the struct bk outside of the union

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1  
Sorry, this is not C++. We don't use void* here. Or C-style casts. Or unions. Or compare functions that aren't operators. –  Cat Plus Plus Oct 14 '11 at 0:55
3  
@CatPlusPlus - I would love if you could have a meeting with my boss about that... –  Nate Oct 14 '11 at 1:01
1  
Is there any reason why you can't define/typedef the bk struct outside the union? –  IronMensan Oct 14 '11 at 1:17

2 Answers 2

You could just declare the structs outside of the union:

struct tt {                     /* Transposition table entry */
        unsigned short hash;    /* - Identifies position */
        short move;             /* - Best recorded move */
        short score;            /* - Score */
        char flag;              /* - How to interpret score */
        char depth;             /* - Remaining search depth */
};
struct bk {                     /* Opening book entry */
        unsigned long hash;     /* - Identifies position */
        short move;             /* - Move for this position */
        unsigned short count;   /* - Frequency */
};

static union {
    struct tt tt[CORE];
    struct bk bk[CORE];
} core;
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This is a poor attempt at compiling C code as C++. You cannot define a type inside an anonymous type and expect to be able to access it. So, the code after fixing this is

struct tt_type {                     /* Transposition table entry */
    unsigned short hash;    /* - Identifies position */
    short move;             /* - Best recorded move */
    short score;            /* - Score */
    char flag;              /* - How to interpret score */
    char depth;             /* - Remaining search depth */
};

struct bk_type {                     /* Opening book entry */
    unsigned long hash;     /* - Identifies position */
    short move;             /* - Move for this position */
    unsigned short count;   /* - Frequency */
};

static union {
    tt_type tt[CORE];
    bk_type bk[CORE];
} core;

static int cmp_bk(const void *ap, const void *bp)
{
    const bk_type *a = (const bk_type*) ap;
    const bk_type *b = (const bk_type*) bp;

    if (a->hash < b->hash) return -1;
    if (a->hash > b->hash) return 1;
    return (int)a->move - (int)b->move;
}

Now, let's move onto how this is not C++ code. First of all, those structs are cumbersome to use — add constructors, at the very least. Second, the unions aren't really type-safe — use boost::variant instead. Third, cmp_bk. Make it operator==(const bk_type&, const bk_type&) — no pointers, no void*, no silly casting. Fourth, fixed-size arrays — almost always a bad idea, inviting all sorts of problems. Use std::vector instead. And by now I'm running out of my sanity points, so I'll finish.

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