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I have these really complicated data files that I have processed and as each file is processed I have used an orderedDictionary to capture the keys and values. Each orderedDictionary is appended to a list so my final result is a list of dictionaries. Because of the diversity in the data captured in these files, they have many keys in common but there are enough uncommon keys to make exporting the data to Excel more complicated than I was hoping for because I really need to push out the data in a consistent structure.

Each key has the structure like

Q_#_SUB_A_COLUMN_#_NUMB_#

so for example I have

 Q_123_SUB_D_COLUMN_C_NUMB_17

We can translate the key as follows

 Question 123
 SubItem D
 Column C
 Instance 17

Because there is a SubItem D, column C and instance 17 there must be a SubItemA, Column B and Instance 16

However, one of the source files might be populated with data values (and keys that range up to the example above and some other source file might terminate with

Q_123_SUB_D_COLUMN_C_NUMB_13

so when I iterate through the list of dictionaries to pull all of the unique key instances so I can use them in csv.dictwriter as the column headings my plan was to sort the resulting list of unique column headings but I can't seem to make the sort work

specifically I need it to sort so that the results look like

 Q_122_SUB_A_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
 Q_122_SUB_B_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
 Q_123_SUB_A_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
 Q_123_SUB_B_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
 Q_123_SUB_C_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
 Q_123_SUB_D_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
 dot
 dot
 dot
 Q_123_SUB_A_COLUMN_C_NUMB_17
 Q_123_SUB_B_COLUMN_C_NUMB_17
 Q_123_SUB_C_COLUMN_C_NUMB_17
 Q_123_SUB_D_COLUMN_C_NUMB_17

The big issue is that I do not know before I open any particular set of these files how many questions are answered, how many sub-questions are answered, how many columns are associated with each question or sub-question or how many instances exist of any particular combination of questions, sub-questions or columns, and I don't want to. Using Python I was able to reduce over 1,200 lines of SAS code to 95 but this last little bit before I start writing it out to a CSV file I can't seem to figure out.

Any observations would be appreciated.

My plan is to find all of the unique keys by iterating through the list of dictionaries and then sort these keys correctly so I can then create a csv file using the keys as column headings. I know that I can find the unique keys push that out and manually sort it and then read the sorted file back but that seems clumsy.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just supply a sufficiently clever function as the key when sorting.

>>> (lambda x: tuple(y(z) for (y, z) 
                     in zip((int, str, str, int), 
                            x.split('_')[1::2])))('Q_122_SUB_A_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1')
(122, 'A', 'C', 1)
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So how can I learn to translate this impressive bit of code –  PyNEwbie Oct 14 '11 at 1:31
    
Start with the slicing, then work your way to lambda. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 14 '11 at 1:34
    
I am on it thanks –  PyNEwbie Oct 14 '11 at 1:36
1  
When the lambda (an unnamed function, basically) is invoked, the functions int, str, str and int are paired up (using zip) with the relevant pieces of the input (found by splitting on '_' and taking every other item with the list slice ([1::2])), and applied to the corresponding piece via the generator expression ((... for ... in ...)). –  Karl Knechtel Oct 14 '11 at 1:40
    
@Ignacio I am giving you the answer but I am still struggling to wrap my head around it even with Karl's observations which helped. I am posting another answer for us newbies. But I really appreciate it as I did learn more –  PyNEwbie Oct 14 '11 at 1:48

You could use a regular expression to extract the different parts of the key and use those to sort with.

e.g.,

import re

names = '''Q_122_SUB_A_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
Q_122_SUB_B_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
Q_123_SUB_B_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
Q_123_SUB_A_COLUMN_C_NUMB_17
Q_123_SUB_D_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
Q_123_SUB_B_COLUMN_C_NUMB_17
Q_123_SUB_C_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
Q_123_SUB_C_COLUMN_C_NUMB_17
Q_123_SUB_A_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1
Q_123_SUB_D_COLUMN_C_NUMB_17'''.split()

def key(name, match=re.compile(r'Q_(\d+)_SUB_(\w+)_COLUMN_(\w+)_NUMB_(\d+)').match):
    # not sure what the actual order is, adjust the priorities accordingly
    return tuple(f(value) for f, value in zip((str, int, int, str), match(name).group(3, 4, 1, 2)))

for name in names:
    print name

names.sort(key=key)

print

for name in names:
    print name

To explain the key-extracting process, we know the that the keys have a certain pattern. A regular expression works great here.

r'Q_(\d+)_SUB_(\w+)_COLUMN_(\w+)_NUMB_(\d+)'
#     ^         ^            ^          ^
#     digits    letters      letters    digits
#     group 1   group 2      group 3    group 4

In regular expressions, parts of the string wrapped in parens are groups. \d represents any decimal digit. + means that there should be one or more of the previous character. So \d+ means one or more decimal digits. \w corresponds to a letter.

Provided a string matches this pattern, we could get easy access to each grouping in that string using the group method. You could access multiple groups just by including more group numbers too

e.g.,

m = match('Q_122_SUB_B_COLUMN_C_NUMB_1')
# m.group(1) == '122'
# m.group(2) == 'B'
# m.group(3, 4) == ('C', '1')

This is similar to Ignacio's approach, only a lot more strict on the pattern. Once you can wrap your head around this, creating the appropriate key for sorting should be simple.

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This is great but I am too stupid to safely implement it. I am under a deadline tonight but I can tell when I get some time I will be back to study this and learn some more. thanks for taking the time –  PyNEwbie Oct 14 '11 at 2:05
    
I'll go ahead and explain how it works too so when you get the chance to look at it, you'll understand what is happening here. –  Jeff Mercado Oct 14 '11 at 2:42
    
wow, that was very nice of you to clarify this I appreciate the trouble you took. –  PyNEwbie Oct 14 '11 at 12:42

Assuming the keys are contained in a list, say keyList

list_to_sort=[]

for key in keyList:
    sortKeys=key.split('_')
    keyTuple=(sortKeys[1],sortKeys[-1],sortKeys[3],sortKeys[5],key)
    list_to_sort.append(keyTuple)

after this the items in the list are tuples that look like

 (123,17,D,C,Q_123_SUB_D_COLUMN_C_NUMB_17)


from operator import itemgetter

list_to_sort.sort(key=itemgetter(0,1,2,3)

I am not sure exactly what itemgetter does but this works and seems simpler, but less elegant than the other two solutions.

Notice that I arranged the keys in the tuple to sort in an order that was different than the way the keys appear live. That was not necessary I could have done

for key in keyList:
    sortKeys=key.split('_')
    keyTuple=(sortKeys[1],sortKeys[3],sortKeys[5],sortKeys[7],key)
    list_to_sort.append(keyTuple)

and then done the sort like so

list_to_sort.sort(key=itemgetter(0,3,1,2)

It was easier for me to track the first one through

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