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My Java teacher (High school course) was talking about loops and she said that if you have a for loop like:

for (int i = 0; i < max; i++) {
    //something
}

you can't use the variable i outside of the loop because the garbage collection feature deletes it because it senses that it's "unneeded" (I know about scopes and that this is BS because the same thing happens in all languages and C++ doesn't even have garbage collection). Now the question is... What does Garbage Collection actually do? (I looked it up and it had something to do with heaps which I don't know about yet so someone explain this to me)

Thanks

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13  
Sigh, friggen high school teachers. –  Mike Christensen Oct 14 '11 at 1:52
2  
To build on what others said, garbage collection works on the heap as opposed to the stack. The stack if where "scoped" data, namely local variables inside a method call, are stored. This is what makes recursion possible, and doesn't require garbage collection. The heap is where your objects and the data in their fields will live. –  Jordan Bentley Oct 14 '11 at 2:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

(I know about scopes and that this is BS because the same thing happens in all languages and C++ doesn't even have garbage collection).

Correct. The variable i can't be used outside the loop because of scope -- it has nothing to do with the GC (outside of potential object reach-ability).

Now the question is... What does Garbage Collection actually do? (I looked it up and it had something to do with heaps which I don't know about yet so someone explain this to me)

The Garbage Collector is responsible for reclaiming objects which are no longer strongly-reachable. A garbage collector has nothing [directly] to do with variables, although a variable can keep an object strongly-reachable. (Also, primitive values, such as int are not objects are thus never dealt with by the GC ;-)

I would recommend reading through Chapter 9 of Inside the Java Virtual Machine: Garbage Collection and The Truth About Garbage Collection as I believe they will provide sufficient answers/insight and justification. (The Garbage Collection wikipedia entry is also a good start and nicely summarizes GC in general.)

From "The Truth":

An object enters an unreachable state when no more strong references to it exist [is not strongly-reachable]. When an object is unreachable, it is a candidate for collection. Note the wording: Just because an object is a candidate for collection doesn't mean it will be immediately collected. The JVM is free to delay collection until there is an immediate need for the memory being consumed by the object.

Happy coding.

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Your teacher's example isn't very good, because i is probably being stored on the stack since it's a primitive. A better example would be:

public String helloWorld() {
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    builder.append("Hello");
    builder.append(" ");
    builder.append("World!");
    return builder.toString();
}

In the first line of the function we allocate a new object (new StringBuilder()). This allocates some memory in the heap, which later needs to be freed. In C++, you'd do delete builder at the end to handle that (or allocate it on the stack -- but you can't do that in Java so I think this is a reasonable example).

Garbage collection is an alternate method, where nothing happens to builder at the end of the function. Instead, periodically, a process called the garbage collector runs, and checks what objects are or aren't in use, and gets rid of anything that's not. In the example I gave, the garbage collector will run, notice that there's no way to access builder anymore, and delete it.

Java's default garbage collector does something called "mark and sweep", where it basically walks through all of the variables it can access and marks them (some flag is set). Then it deletes anything that's not marked.

I think at an even lower level, what it actually does is move everything that's accessible to a new memory location, and delete anything in the old memory location (because anything still there wasn't accessible).

An easier garbage collection method is called "reference counting", where everything that's dynamically allocated has a reference count -- telling the program how many variables are pointed at that memory location. If the reference count ever hits 0, no one is using that memory and it can be immediately freed. Last time I checked, the standard Python interpreter (CPython) uses this.

The problem with reference counting is that you can get loops:

class Node {
    Node next;
}

public void breakReferenceCountingAlgorithm() {
    Node a = new Node();
    Node b = new Node();
    a.next = b;
    b.next = a;
}

At the end of this function, a and b are both referenced once (by each other), but they're not accessible. Java will catch this and garbage collect them anyway. Python would not.


On another note, the reason you can't use i outside of that loop you gave is scoping, not garbage collection. Inside of the function, i's memory is probably still available, the compiler just won't let you access it. Mainly so you can do this:

for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    System.out.println("stuff");
}

// This i is a different variable
for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    System.out.println("more stuff");
}
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