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For my Java class, we need to make a bank account that has the methods of withdrawing, depositing money, and displaying current balance. In the Tester class, I want to make it ask for the name, the balance, then allow you to choose 1, 2, or 3. Then it repeats the option you choose until you say type "n". The problem is that running this code causes it to say after you deposit money "You deposited (amount of money deposited) in the account (name of account). Your new balance is (this)." The part where it says "this" is the exact same of the amount of money deposited. In other words, it doesn't add it, it just makes the new balance the same as the deposit, regardless of how much was in before. Any help? Thanks.

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
public class BankAccount
{
    public BankAccount(double b, String n)
    {
        double balance = b;
        String name = n;
    }
    public void deposit(double d)
    {
        balance += d;
    }
    public void withdraw(double w)
    {
        balance -= w;
    }
    public String nickname()
    {
        System.out.print("Enter a new name: ");
        Scanner kbIn = new Scanner(System.in);
        String n = kbIn.nextLine();
        return n;
    }
    double balance;
    String name;
}

And the tester class:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
public class Tester
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Scanner kbInLine = new Scanner(System.in);
        Scanner kbIn = new Scanner(System.in);

        System.out.print("Enter your name: ");
        String name = kbInLine.nextLine();

        System.out.print("Please enter balance: $");
        double balance = kbIn.nextDouble();

        BankAccount myAccount = new BankAccount(balance, name);
        String proceed = "y";

        while(proceed.equalsIgnoreCase("y"))
        {
            System.out.println("\nPlease pick a number. Would you like to...\n\t 1. Deposit\n\t 2. Withdraw\n\t 3. Print Balance\n");
            int choice = kbIn.nextInt();

            switch(choice)
            {
                case 1:
                    System.out.print("How much would you like to deposit?\n\t$");
                    double deposit = kbIn.nextDouble();
                    myAccount.deposit(deposit);
                    System.out.println("You have deposited $" + deposit + " into the account of " + name + ". The new balance is: " + myAccount.balance);
                    break;
                case 2:
                    System.out.print("How much would you like to withdraw?\n\t$");
                    double withdraw = kbIn.nextDouble();
                    if(myAccount.balance - withdraw > 0)
                    {
                        myAccount.withdraw(withdraw);
                        System.out.println("You have withdrawn $" + withdraw + " from the account of " + name + ". The new balance is: " + myAccount.balance);
                    }
                    else    
                    {
                        System.out.println("Sorry, you have insufficient funds for this operation. Your existing balance is $" + myAccount.balance);
                    }
                    break;
                case 3:
                    System.out.print("The balance in the account of " + name + " is $" + myAccount.balance);
                    break;
            }
            System.out.print("\nWould you like to do another transaction? (Y/N)");
            proceed = kbIn.next();
        }
        System.out.println("\nThank you for banking with us. Have a good day!");
    }
}


What's really wierd is that I did a project before this one (it's actually a simplified version) where it deposits and then withdraws a predetermined, coded amount, then outputs the new bank balance, and it does it fine. But the code for BankBalance is the same. Here's the code for those.
BankAccount class is:

public class BankAccount
{
    public BankAccount(String nm, double amt) // Constructor
    {
        name = nm;
        balance = amt;
    }
    public void deposit(double d) // Sets up deposit object as balance += d
    {
        balance += d;
    }
    public void withdraw(double w) // Sets up withdraw object as balance -= w
    {
        balance -= w;
    }

    public double balance;
    public String name;
}

And the Tester class is:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
public class Tester
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Scanner kbIn = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.print("Enter your name:");
        String name = kbIn.nextLine();

        System.out.print("Enter the balance:");
        double balance = kbIn.nextDouble();

        BankAccount myAccount = new BankAccount(name, balance);
        myAccount.deposit(505.22);
        System.out.println(myAccount.balance);
        myAccount.withdraw(100.00);

        System.out.println("The " + myAccount.name + " account balance is, $" + myAccount.balance);
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're not actually initialising your balance member variable here:

public BankAccount(double b, String n)
{
    double balance = b;

This creates a new local variable called balance, to which you assign the value of b. The member variable balance will remain 0 (the default) after this constructor is run.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, he's creating a local variable that shadows the class field. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 14 '11 at 2:33
    
I don't really know why, then, but there's another project i did (this is an expansion of it) where it simplifies this by depositing and withdrawing a predetermined amount, and just stating the bank balance. It does this, but it's the exact same bankaccount class. I'll post those in an update to the above post. – Alex G Oct 14 '11 at 3:19
    
Ok, i think i've got it. In the first one (where it didn't work), I was re-initializing my state variables by saying "double" or "string". In the second one, where it works, I was only declaring them as a value by not including "String". Thanks for the help! – Alex G Oct 14 '11 at 3:39
    
Right, in the first one you're creating new local variables with the same name as the member variables. Assigning to those local variables doesn't change the member variables. In the second one, you're assigning to the member variables, which is what you want. – Greg Hewgill Oct 14 '11 at 3:41

public BankAccount(double b, String n) { double balance = b; String name = n; }

--->

public BankAccount(double b, String n) { this.balance = b; this.name = n; }

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know what "this" means, I'm looking it up now. But that worked. Thanks. – Alex G Oct 14 '11 at 3:26
    
Also, any idea why the code in the other previous project worked? (I updated my post so it shows the older project). – Alex G Oct 14 '11 at 3:26
    
My English is poor,so I can't explain it to you in English.I'm sorry. – LiuwkCn Oct 14 '11 at 4:02

Or you can declare balance as static (data class field), and the methods that use this variable as static too.

share|improve this answer

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