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When Executing the following linq to sql statement:

    var stuff = from l in _db.SqlLinks
                select new
                           {
                               Link = l,
                               Rating = (from v in l.SqlLinkVotes
                                         where v.Tag == tagId
                                               && v.VoteDate >= since
                                         select v.Vote).Sum(),
                               NumberOfVotes = (from v in l.SqlLinkVotes
                                                where v.Tag == tagId
                                                      && v.VoteDate >= since
                                                select v.Vote).Count(),
                               NumberOfComments = (from v in l.SqlLinkVotes
                                                   where v.Tag == tagId
                                                         && v.VoteDate >= since
                                                         && v.Comment != ""
                                                   select v.Vote).Count()
                           };

I get a System.InvalidOperationException (null value cannot be assigned to Int32).

Through debugging I've seen that this comes from the Rating property of the dynamic object.

When there are no SqlLinkVotes for a particular link the Sum() results in a null value, but Rating is an int, and linq to sql thinks the Sum() will result in an int, not a nullable int.

I could easily write a stored procedure to get around this, but I thought it was a good way for me to understand linq to sql more.

Please help!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There's a Connect thread about this which suggests that you cast the result of Sum() to a nullable type (int? in your case). I suspect if you want the rating to be non-nullable, you can then use the null-coalescing operator:

Rating = ((int?) (from v in l.SqlLinkVotes
                  where v.Tag == tagId
                     && v.VoteDate >= 
                  select v.Vote).Sum()) ?? 0

It's worth a try, anyway.

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Aha! You beat me to it! I just posted the same thing. –  Matthew Rathbone Apr 22 '09 at 9:05
    
This answer works - got bitten by this a few weeks ago, found this fix. –  Kurt Schelfthout Apr 22 '09 at 9:07
    
Man that's a frustrating little problem though –  Matthew Rathbone Apr 22 '09 at 9:12

Looks like simply casting the Rating field as a nullable int has fixed it.

Does this look sensible to other people?

var stuff = from l in _db.SqlLinks
                        select new
                                   {
                                       Link = l,
                                       Rating = (int?)(from v in l.SqlLinkVotes
                                                 where v.Tag == tagId
                                                       && v.VoteDate >= since
                                                 select v.Vote).Sum(),
                                       NumberOfVotes = (from v in l.SqlLinkVotes
                                                        where v.Tag == tagId
                                                              && v.VoteDate >= since
                                                        select v.Vote).Count(),
                                       NumberOfComments = (from v in l.SqlLinkVotes
                                                           where v.Tag == tagId
                                                                 && v.VoteDate >= since
                                                                 && v.Comment != ""
                                                           select v.Vote).Count()
                                   };
share|improve this answer
    
Yes. As my answer suggests, you could use the null-coalescing operator to get back to a non-nullable form using 0 as the default if you wanted. (I hope that would work, anyway...) –  Jon Skeet Apr 22 '09 at 9:05
    
It does, thankfully! I'm turning this dynamic object into a defined object just a little further down the method so I'm replacing the nulls there. –  Matthew Rathbone Apr 22 '09 at 9:13

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