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This is actually the program my instructor had provided with us to work with, i had to make several changes thus far to get it to at least compile:

 #include <dirent.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <cctype>
#include <cstdio>
#include <string>
#include <list>

using namespace std;
std::string makeString();
std::string path= "/";
DIR*dirp;
struct dirent*direntp;
std::list<string> child_directories;



void dir_traverse(&path, ios::out){
    list<string> child_directories;
    DIR*dirp = opendir(path.data());
    struct dirent*dir_entry = readdir(dirp);
        while(dir_entry !=null){ 
             unsigned char d_type = dir_entry->d_type==DT_OIR?'D' : 'R';
             if(d_type == 'D'){ 
                if(dir_entry->d_name[0]!= '.')
                    {
                    child_directories push_back(dir_entry_d_name);
                }

             }
            out<<'\t'<<d_type<<":"<<dir_entry->d_name<<endl;
            dir_entry= readdir(dirp);
        }
        list<string>::iterator it = child_directories.begin();
        while(it! = child_directories.end())
            {
                dir_traverse(&path + "/" + *it, out);
                it++;
            }
        closedir(dirp);
}

I get the error I have as the title in reference to the dir_traverse function. I am pretty much interested in figuring out what is causing the problem and why. Half of what is going on in the function I don't really get at the moment, which is probably why I am having this compiling issue. just not up to speed on c/c++ yet :)

thanks

edit:

void dir_traverse(string& path, ostream& out){
    list<string> child_directories;
    DIR*dirp = opendir(path.data());
    struct dirent*dir_entry = readdir(dirp);
        while(dir_entry !=NULL){ 
             unsigned char d_type = dir_entry->d_type==DT_DIR?'D' : 'R';
             if(d_type == 'D'){ 
                if(dir_entry->d_name[0]!= '.')
                    {
                    child_directories.push_back(dir_entry_d_name);
                }

             }
            out<<'\t'<<d_type<<":"<<dir_entry->d_name<<endl;
            dir_entry= readdir(dirp);
        }
        list<string>::iterator it = child_directories.begin();
        while(it != child_directories.end())
            {
                dir_traverse(&path + "/" + *it, out);
                it++;
            }
        closedir(dirp);
}
share|improve this question
    
Mark the line in the code where compiler shows the error. –  Alok Save Oct 14 '11 at 3:54
    
What did the header of the dir_traverse() function look like before you changed it? Something more like void dir_traverse(const std::string& path, std::ostream& out)? –  Johnsyweb Oct 14 '11 at 3:58
    
yes that is close to what is was: void dir_traverse(string path, ostream&out) –  user975044 Oct 14 '11 at 4:03
    
Thought so. So when you said "i had to make several changes thus far to get it to at least compile", what you meant was "I made several changes thus far and now it doesn't compile". Your code is littered with syntax errors and unnecessary header directives and redundant variable declarations. What is the purpose of your homework exercise? (I want to help, I just do not want to do your homework for you.) –  Johnsyweb Oct 14 '11 at 4:16
    
this isn't the homework assignment actually, this is just what the instructor ran through in class. My intention was to work with it for the hw since this would really help. I need to search through directories and compare all the files in them with a given file to see if it matches already existing files. I have edited my question was the original code we walked through –  user975044 Oct 14 '11 at 4:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Okay, so you need to make a few changes to your instructor's sample to get it to compile.

I'm going to assume you've included the four headers needed to compile. I recommend you pull in just the following four symbols from the std namespace, rather than the whole lot. Personally I prefer to refer to std::string in my code.

using std::string;
using std::ostream;
using std::list;
using std::endl;

Anyway, only the following three lines need to be fixed:

void dir_traverse(string& path, ostream& out) 

Should be...

void dir_traverse(const string& path, ostream& out)

Because you later pass in a temporary when you call the function recursively.

            child_directories.push_back(dir_entry_d_name); 

Should be...

            child_directories.push_back(dir_entry->d_name);

This looks like a typo!

    dir_traverse(&path + "/" + *it, out);

Should be...

    dir_traverse(path + "/" + *it, out);

This looks like a typo, too. This is where you create the temporary path string that I mentioned earlier. This must be passed as a const reference (since it is not passed by value).

As you practise more, you'll become more attuned to your compiler's error messages!

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
yup saw the typos.. not sure it that was a pencil to paper typo or a chalk to chalk board typo! This class is literally like being thrown off the deep end. No c/c++ experience whatsoever just Java so its been an uphill battle. Thank you so much for helping me out :) –  user975044 Oct 14 '11 at 5:05
1  
Board and chalk? Old school! –  Johnsyweb Oct 14 '11 at 6:15
void dir_traverse(&path, ios::out)

That looks like a function definition, except that the arguments are wrong. A function is declared like this:

return_type function_name( arg0_type arg0, ..., argN_type argN )
share|improve this answer
    
awesome, got rid of that error now its picking up all kinds of issues in the function it wasn't before lol –  user975044 Oct 14 '11 at 4:01

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