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I'd like to make object of class not copyable so I put copy constructor and operator= in private section. However one class is friend of this class so it has access to private methods. Is it good idea to put throw exception in copy constructor and operator= to be sure that object will not be copied?

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Note that you should take the given advice always, not only if you have friends, because the class itself shouldn't be able to make copies of its kind either. –  UncleBens Oct 14 '11 at 14:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One approach to make it not copyable is just to declare the copy constructor, but don't implement it at all. That will force a linker error at compile time if anyone tries to use it.

class foo
{
private:
    foo(const foo&); // not defined
    foo& operator=(const foo&); // not defined
};
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41 seconds...fine. :) –  GManNickG Oct 14 '11 at 5:59
    
Ah, thanks! You were pretty fast too... –  Mysticial Oct 14 '11 at 6:00

@Mysticial have answered this question which is usually done in C++03. But in C++11, you can do this, more nicely:

class foo
{
private:
    foo(const foo&) = delete; 
    foo& operator=(const foo&) = delete; 
};

The =delete conveys the message that foo doesn't support copy-semantic, as it has been disabled by explicitly marking it with delete. I've explained this in detail here:

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What does that do? –  Brendan Long Oct 14 '11 at 6:06
    
@BrendanLong: I edited the post with a link. Please go through that. –  Nawaz Oct 14 '11 at 6:09

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