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I have the following code sequence And I don't understand the compilation error (below the code).

Thanks in advance,

Iulian

class X {
public:

    int a;

    X()
    {
        a = 0;
    }

    bool operator == (const X&r)
    {
        return  a == r.a;
    }

    bool operator != (const X&r)
    {
        return !( *this == r );
    }
};

class DX : public X
{
public:
    int dx;
    DX()
    {
        dx = 1;
    }

    bool operator == (const DX&r)
    {

        if( dx != r.dx ) return false;
        const X * lhs = this;
        const X * rhs = &r;

        if ( *lhs != *rhs ) return false;

        return true;
    }

    bool operator != (const DX&r)
    {
        return !( *this == r );
    }
};

int main(void)
{
    DX d1;
    DX d2;
    d1 == d2;
    return 0;
}

The error:

d:\Projects\cpptests>cl opequal.cpp Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 15.00.30729.01 for 80x86 Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

opequal.cpp opequal.cpp(38) : error C2678: binary '!=' : no operator found which takes a lef t-hand operand of type 'const X' (or there is no acceptable conversion) opequal.cpp(16): could be 'bool X::operator !=(const X &)' while trying to match the argument list '(const X, const X)'

share|improve this question
    
You're trying to define == in terms of != and != in terms of == -- and in the body of ==, the != operator isn't defined yet. You should also make all your operators const. –  Kerrek SB Oct 14 '11 at 7:21
    
Warning: it's a good idea to declare your equality operators as free functions; ( X(1) == DX() ) <==> ( DX() == X(1) ) is hard to guarantee this way. –  xtofl Oct 14 '11 at 7:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to declare your operator== and operator!= functions as const.

Eg.

bool operator == (const X&r) const
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks; It seems I didn't wake up this morning ... :( –  INS Oct 14 '11 at 7:22

Your operator function declarations should look like this

bool operator == (const X&r) const

Placing const on the end of a member function promises that the function does not modify any member of the class (unless such members are declared mutable). Any function lacking this keyword will be assumed to be a mutator, and the compiler will not allow them to be called on a const instance of the class.

You can overload a function with the same arguments with and without const. In this case the const version will only be called on const instances of the class. For example, STL containers overload their operator[] to return const references instead of plain references.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the details; I really think I'm experiencing a rough morning. –  INS Oct 14 '11 at 7:27

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