Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider this code:

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
    A(int data) : data_(data)
    { std::cout << "A(" << data_ << ")" << std::endl; }
    ~A() { std::cout << "~A()" << std::endl; }
    void a() { std::cout << data_ << std::endl; }
private:
    int data_;
};

class B
{
public:
    B(): a_(new A(13)) { std::cout << "B()" << std::endl; }
    ~B() { std::cout << "~B()" << std::endl; }
    std::function<void()> getf()
    {
        return [=]() { a_->a(); };
    }
private:
    std::shared_ptr<A> a_;
};

int main()
{
    std::function<void()> f;
    {
        B b;
        f = b.getf();
    }
    f();
    return 0;
}

Here it looks like I'm capturing a_ shared pointer by value, but when I run it on Linux (GCC 4.6.1), this is printed:

A(13)
B()
~B()
~A()
0

Obviously, 0 is wrong, because A is already destroyed. It looks like this is actually captured and is used to look up this->a_. My suspicion is confirmed when I change the capture list from [=] to [=,a_]. Then the correct output is printed and the lifetime of the objects is as expected:

A(13)
B()
~B()
13
~A()

The question:

Is this behaviour specified by the standard, implementation-defined, or undefined? Or I'm crazy and it's something entirely different?

share|improve this question
1  
I think it's by the standard as a_ usually resolves to this->a_, unless you explicitly tell it to copy a_. –  Dani Oct 14 '11 at 7:51
2  
Seems entirely legit to me - the only variable in scope is this. It'd be surprising if a pointer were just magically member-dereferenced! A nice question, though, and a great warning for the kids not to use the lazy captures [=]/[&] recklessly. –  Kerrek SB Oct 14 '11 at 7:53
    
actually [=,a_] is invalid. –  pongba Aug 18 '12 at 16:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Is this behaviour specified by the standard

Yes. Capturing member variables is always done via capturing this; it is the only way to access a member variable. In the scope of a member function a_ is equivalent to (*this).a_. This is true in Lambdas as well.

Therefore, if you use this (implicitly or explicitly), then you must ensure that the object remains alive while the lambda instance is around.

If you want to capture it by value, you must explicitly do so:

std::function<void()> getf()
{
    auto varA = a_;
    return [=]() { varA->a(); };
}

If you need a spec quote:

The lambda-expression’s compound-statement yields the function-body ( 8.4 ) of the function call operator, but for purposes of name lookup (3.4), determining the type and value of this (9.3.2) and transforming id-expressions referring to non-static class members into class member access expressions using (*this) ( 9.3.1 ), the compound-statement is considered in the context of the lambda-expression.

share|improve this answer
5  
IMHO, one of the most horrible gotchas of lambdas. I just hope all compilers eventually add a big fat warning for this. –  Martin Ba Oct 14 '11 at 8:01
4  
@Martin: Why would you warn for that? If the lambda were being used internally in an algorithm, it would be perfectly fine. He only ran into a problem because he wae returning the lambda to someone. –  Nicol Bolas Oct 14 '11 at 8:15
3  
@Dani but it's not an error to return a shared_ptr to a member. It seems like a potential common error, as I ran into it when converting existing code. I do think there be a warning (at least on -Wextra), and could be silenced when you access the member explicitly via this->, for example, or add it to the capture list. –  Alex B Oct 14 '11 at 8:53
7  
@Nicol: to me, the problem here isn't that nasty old C++ is letting me shoot myself in the foot, the problem is that the lambda's "capture by value" silently captures this rather than _a. That's worth an optional warning, IMO, whether the lambda is returned or not. If the warning encouraged you to write (*this)._a explicitly, then it would be obvious that it's this that is captured. Compilers warn for other things that are much less dangerous and less subtly incorrect. –  Steve Jessop Oct 14 '11 at 9:19
6  
@Nicol: I don't want to "penalize" anyone, I think an optional warning is justified. You don't have to enable it, so I find it surprising that you're so passionate that it shouldn't even be available for others. You find it obvious that [=] captures this, not _a, because you are entirely familiar with the standard in that area. That's great, but compilers warn for far less difficult subtleties of the language. –  Steve Jessop Oct 14 '11 at 9:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.