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Left and right shift operators (<< and >>) are already available in C++. However, I couldn't find out how I could perform circular shift or rotate operations.

How can operations like "Rotate Left" and "Rotate Right" be performed?

Rotating right twice here

Initial --> 1000 0011 0100 0010

should result in:

Final   --> 1010 0000 1101 0000

An example would be helpful.

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13 Answers 13

up vote 26 down vote accepted

using the inline assembler:

__asm
{
rol number,1
}

Clarification: rol, ror are the bitshift operators of the cpu. the one represents the amount. You can use normal variable names in the inline assemler.

Addit: Here's a page with solutions in C

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10  
This assumes a particular architecture of course, and makes the code acutely less portable. :) Obvious points, but worth mentioning, imo. –  unwind Apr 22 '09 at 10:38
    
x86 only? Or does this work on all CPUs? –  MSalters Apr 22 '09 at 10:38
3  
it works on all cpus with the ROL/R commands. So the answer is: "no. But on most relevant ones." However, when you look at the examples under the link, you see that, this is really the most elegant solution, as everything else gets wordy and/or produces much more machine code. –  AndreasT Apr 22 '09 at 10:48
4  
It only works with MSVC++ though (and Intel on a windows platform) –  Joe D Apr 25 '10 at 13:17
4  
I just hacked ROL together with bitshifts in C, and gcc actually emitted a ROL instruction. Looks like you don't need assembly for performance. –  maxy Nov 10 '12 at 20:40

Since it's C++, use an inline function:

template <typename INT> 
INT rol(INT val) {
    return (val << 1) | (val >> (sizeof(INT)*CHAR_BIT-1));
}

C++0x would add constexpr as the return expression is an ICE if the argument is.

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Is this really a rotate left? And isn't the part with the sizeof missing an &, or something? –  unwind Apr 22 '09 at 10:40
    
Looks like a rotate right, but otherwise correct –  James Hopkin Apr 22 '09 at 10:52
    
Fixed the roation direction, and this assumes you're shifting in zeroes on both sides (which is why you shouldn't do this for signed integer types). –  MSalters Apr 22 '09 at 14:25
    
shouldn't INT be T? –  efaj Mar 9 '13 at 18:30
1  
Warning: This code is broken if INT is a signed integer and the sign is set! Test for example rol<std::int32_t>(1 << 31) which should flip over to 1 but actually becomes -1 (because the sign is retained). –  Nobody Jun 2 at 20:49

Most compilers have intrinsics for that. Visual Studio for example _rotr8, _rotr16

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How abt something like this, using the standard bitset ...

#include <bitset> 
#include <iostream> 

template <std::size_t N> 
inline void 
rotate(std::bitset<N>& b, unsigned m) 
{ 
   b = b << m | b >> (N-m); 
} 

int main() 
{ 
   std::bitset<8> b(15); 
   std::cout << b << '\n'; 
   rotate(b, 2); 
   std::cout << b << '\n'; 

   return 0;
}

HTH,

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Need to modify it to account for shifts greater than the length of the bitset. –  Harley Green Mar 7 '11 at 2:54

Definitively:

template<class T>
T ror(T x, unsigned int moves)
{
  return (x >> moves) | (x << sizeof(T)*8 - moves);
}
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In details you can apply the following logic.

If Bit Pattern is 33602 in Integer

1000 0011 0100 0010

and you need to Roll over with 2 right shifs then: first make a copy of bit pattern and then left shift it: Length - RightShift i.e. length is 16 right shift value is 2 16 - 2 = 14

After 14 times left shifting you get.

1000 0000 0000 0000

Now right shift the value 33602, 2 times as required. You get

0010 0000 1101 0000

Now take an OR between 14 time left shifted value and 2 times right shifted value.

1000 0000 0000 0000
0010 0000 1101 0000
===================
1010 0000 1101 0000
===================

And you get your shifted rollover value. Remember bit wise operations are faster and this don't even required any loop.

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1  
Similar to the subroutines above... b = b << m | b >> (N-m); –  S M Kamran Apr 22 '09 at 11:41
    
Shouldn't that be XOR, not OR? 1 ^ 0 = 1, 0 ^ 0 = 0, etc. If it's OR it's not exclusive, thus it'll always be 1. –  B.K. Mar 26 '13 at 21:11

Assuming you want to shift right by L bits, and the input x is a number with N bits:

unsigned ror(unsigned x, int L, int N) 
{
    unsigned lsbs = x & ((1 << L) - 1);
    return (x >> L) | (lsbs << (N-L));
}
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or you can use this: if x is 8bit:

x=(x>>1 | x<<7);
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The correct answer is following:

#define BYTE_BITS 8
#define BitsCount( val ) ( sizeof( val ) * BYTE_BITS )
#define Shift( val, steps ) ( steps % BitsCount( val ) )
#define ROL( val, steps ) ( ( val << Shift( val, steps ) ) | ( val >> ( BitsCount( val ) - Shift( val, steps ) ) ) )
#define ROR( val, steps ) ( ( val >> Shift( val, steps ) ) | ( val << ( BitsCount( val ) - Shift( val, steps ) ) ) )
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Overload a function:

unsigned int rotate_right(unsigned int x)
{
 return (x>>1 | (x&1?0x80000000:0))
}

unsigned short rotate_right(unsigned short x) { /* etc. */ }
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#define ROTATE_RIGHT(x) ( (x>>1) | (x&1?0x8000:0) )
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you should wrap x into parentheses to avoid nasty surprises with expressions as argument to the macro. –  Joey Apr 22 '09 at 10:32
3  
If the value's not 16-bit, you silently get nonsense –  James Hopkin Apr 22 '09 at 10:32
    
If defining it as a macro, one then also need to be careful to avoid passing an expression with side effects as the argument. –  Novelocrat Mar 6 '13 at 7:32

Source Code x bit number

int x =8;
data =15; //input
unsigned char tmp;
for(int i =0;i<x;i++)
{
printf("Data & 1    %d\n",data&1);
printf("Data Shifted value %d\n",data>>1^(data&1)<<(x-1));
tmp = data>>1|(data&1)<<(x-1);
data = tmp;  
}
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another suggestion

template<class T>
inline T rotl(T x, unsigned char moves){
    unsigned char temp;
    __asm{
        mov temp, CL
        mov CL, moves
        rol x, CL
        mov CL, temp
    };
    return x;
}
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