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I have a certain part of my site that checks if the logged on user can access the id of a record (Report id), if so they can view the content on that page. There can be various different types of users/companies that will view the content.

What is the best practise for writing a custom attribute that will check if user can access the id? Should I pass in a query string? Note that the id will come from the route/url.

E.g. Report id = 678. urls:

  • /Report/678/Detail
  • /Report/678/Progress/Staged
  • /Report/678/TaskManager/78/
  • /Report/678/Participants

usage of code below

[ReportAuthorizationAttribute ())] //get query string yourself
[ReportAuthorizationAttribute (Request.Querystring["reportid"))] //this does not look possible to do???

//Code that will be added to the base controller for this area

public class ReportAuthorizationAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{

    /// <summary>
    /// inject via Ninject - there must be a better way? Using service locator?
    /// </summary>
    [Inject]
    public readonly IReportRepo _repo { get; set; }
    [Inject]
    public readonly IUserSession _user { get; set; }

    private int _reportid;

    public ReportAuthorizationAttribute()
        : base()
    { //*Is this way the best way?*
     _reportid= Int32.Parse(HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString["reportid"]);
    }

    public ReportAuthorizationAttribute(params int reportid)
        : base()
    {
        _reportid = reportid;
    }

    public ReportAuthorizationAttribute(params string reportid)
        : base()
    {
        _reportid= Int32.Parse(reportid);
    }


    public bool AlwaysAllowLocalRequests = false;


    protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {

        if (httpContext == null)
            throw new NoAccessException("httpContext is null");

        if (!httpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
            throw new NoAccessException("unauthorized user");

        var companyid = _user.GetCurrentUser().CompanyID;
        if (AlwaysAllowLocalRequests && _repo.IsCompanyParticipantInReport(_reportid, companyid))
            return true;

        return false;
    }


}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

//Is this way the best way?

_reportid= Int32.Parse(HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString["reportid"]);

If you use routing, reportid won't be part of the query string. You need to fetch it from the route:

var reportId = filterContext.RequestContext.RouteData.Values["reportId"];

Also don't use HttpContext.Current in your action filter constructor. Use it only inside the AuthorizeCore method:

public class ReportAuthorizationAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    [Inject]
    public readonly IReportRepo _repo { get; set; }

    [Inject]
    public readonly IUserSession _user { get; set; }

    public bool AlwaysAllowLocalRequests = false;

    private string _reportId;

    public override void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        _reportId = filterContext.RequestContext.RouteData.Values["reportId"] as string;
        base.OnAuthorization(filterContext);
    }

    protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        if (httpContext == null)
            return false;

        if (!httpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
            return false;

        int reportId;
        if (!int.TryParse(_reportId, out reportId))
            return false;

        var companyid = _user.GetCurrentUser().CompanyID;
        return AlwaysAllowLocalRequests && 
               _repo.IsCompanyParticipantInReport(reportId, companyid));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Query string and route data, I am not sure what the difference is, all I know that it will be in my url, I have set up the routes so that if I say /Report/{reportid}/Details, You are saying this is accessible in route data and not query string? Sorry, I really dont know! –  Haroon Oct 14 '11 at 9:02
2  
@Harron, a query string is what comes after the ? in a url. For example: /Report/Detail?reportId=678. You could use Request.QueryString in this case. But in your example reportId is part of the route definition: /Report/{reportid}/Details, so you cannot use QueryString to fetch it. You should use RouteData as shown in my answer. –  Darin Dimitrov Oct 14 '11 at 9:04
    
Thanks, This line however does not work, I dont seem to have access to RequestContext: httpContext.Request.RequestContext.RouteData.Values[""] –  Haroon Oct 14 '11 at 9:08
    
@Haroon, oh you are not using .NET 4.0? That explains it. I have eupdated my post. –  Darin Dimitrov Oct 14 '11 at 9:14
    
thank you! btw, do you think that doing a permissions check like this is ok/ good practise? This is the only way I could think of to make it generic, else I am repeating stuff all over the place... –  Haroon Oct 14 '11 at 9:20

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