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I need to copy-construct an object simultaneously changing it's type to another class being a member of the same class-hierarchy. I've read about polymorphic copy-constructors and (hopefully) understand the idea behind it. Yet, I still don't know if this pattern applies to my case and, if so, how to implement it. I think it's best if I show what I need on an example.

There is a Base class and two child classes, Child1 and Child2. I need to create an object of type Child2 basing on Child1, ie. most of all, I need to copy the object p_int is pointing to from Child1 to Child2. I've written a simple program to illustrate it:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Base {
public:
    Base() { p_int = new int; *p_int = 0; }
    ~Base() { delete p_int; }
    virtual Base* clone() const = 0;

    void setpInt(int val) { *p_int = val; }
    void setInt(int val) { a = val; }
    virtual void print() {
        cout << "Base: ";
        cout << (long)p_int << ":" << *p_int << " " << a << endl;
    }
protected:
    int* p_int;
    int a;
};

class Child1 : public Base {
public:
    Child1() {};
    Child1(const Child1& child) {
        p_int = new int (*child.p_int);
        a = child.a + 1;
    }

    Base* clone() const { return new Child1(*this); }

    void print() {
        cout << "Child1: ";
        cout << (long)p_int << ":" << *p_int << " " << a << endl;
    }
};

class Child2 : public Base {
public:
    Child2() {};
    Child2(const Child2& child) {
        p_int = new int (*child.p_int);
        a = child.a + 1;
    }

    Base* clone() const { return new Child2(*this); }

    void print() {
        cout << "Child2: ";
        cout << (long)p_int << ":" << *p_int << " " << a << endl;
    }
};

int main() {
    Child1* c1 = new Child1();
    Child2* c2;

    c1->setpInt(4);
    c1->print();

    c2 = (Child2*)c1->clone();
    c2->print();
}

Unfortunately, the outcome is as below, ie. there is no type conversion:

Child1: 162611224:4 0
Child1: 162611272:4 1

What exactly do I need to implement, to be able to achieve what I need? I'm starting to think there is a type-conversion mechanism I need to implement rather than a polymorphic copy-constructor, but I'm confused already.

EDIT: Asked a follow up here

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Your code generates memory leaks: in the copy constructor of your derived classes, you allocate new memory and assign its address to p_int without releasing the memory previously allocated in Base's default constructor. –  Luc Touraille Oct 14 '11 at 9:07
    
Does it? I thought the virtual Base class'es destructor would free the memory reserved for Child1.p_int, or wouldn't it? –  mmm Oct 14 '11 at 9:12
2  
Yes, the virtual destructor will free the memory pointed to by p_int, but you allocate twice (once in Base's constructor and once in Child's constructor) and free only once (in the destructor). What you need to do is provide a Base constructor parameterized by p_int (and probably a too), so that derived classes can provide their own value: class Base { protected: Base(int * inp_int, int ina) : p_int(inp_int), a(ina) {} ... }; class Child1 : public Base { public: Child1(Child1 const & child) : Base(new int (*child.p_int), child.a + 1) {} ... };. –  Luc Touraille Oct 14 '11 at 9:20
1  
It is a bit weird that your derived classes need direct access to the data members of the base class, perhaps you could review your design to have a better encapsulation (if Base contains these data members, it should be responsible for their management; if all the manipulation on this data is performed by derived classes, then it should probably be moved there. Responsabilities of each class should be well defined). –  Luc Touraille Oct 14 '11 at 9:23
    
The example only shows the piece of code I'm having problems with, not the whole functionality the actual Base class will have. It's going to make use the p_int, of course. –  mmm Oct 14 '11 at 9:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Simplest solution would probably be to implement a Child2 constructor taking a Child1& as parameter. Then you could simply call:

Child2* c2 = new Child2(*c1);
share|improve this answer
    
This should not work. The copy-constructor expects const Child2&, not const Child1&. –  Nawaz Oct 14 '11 at 9:05
1  
@Nawaz: It can take a const Child2&, although then it's not called a copy constructor anymore, then it's a conversion constructor. –  imre Oct 14 '11 at 9:07
1  
I'm not suggesting a copy constructor: I'm suggesting @mmm defines a new Child2 constructor which expects a Child1& - that is define Child2::Child2(const Child1&) –  Chowlett Oct 14 '11 at 9:08
1  
@Nawaz: Why wouldn't it work? What the OP asks for is a conversion constructor, not a copy constructor, so this answer seems perfectly valid to me. –  Luc Touraille Oct 14 '11 at 9:09
    
@LucTouraille: Oops. I misread the answer. –  Nawaz Oct 14 '11 at 9:10

If you only have 2 child classes, then the easiest way is to create a conversion constructor:

class Child2: public Base
{
public: 
    Child2(Child1 const& child)
    {
            p_int = new int (*child.p_int);
            a = child.a + 1;        
    }
}; 

c2 = new Child2(*c1); 

If you have several Child classes, and you need to create a Child2 from any of them, then you could do something like this:

class Base
{
public: 
    void CopyFrom(Base* base)
    {
            p_int = new int (*base.p_int);
            a = base.a + 1;     
    }
}; 

class ChildX: public Base
{
public: 
    static ChildX* CreateFrom(Base* base)
    {
        ChildX ch = new ChildX(); 
        ch->CopyFrom(base); 
        return ch; 
    }
}; 

c2 = Child2::CreateFrom(c1); 
share|improve this answer
1  
You can even avoid duplicating the createFrom static member function by making it a template in the base class: template <typename Child> static Child * CreateFrom(Base * base) { Child ch = new Child(); ch->copyFrom(base); return ch; } c2 = Base::CreateFrom<Child2>(c1); –  Luc Touraille Oct 14 '11 at 9:13
c2 = (Child2*)c1->clone();

Here is a serious bug, and the c-style cast hides the bug.

If you use C++-style cast, then it will not hide the bug, and you will know it. In this case, the C++-style cast is : dynamic_cast. Use it to discover the bug yourself.

As it is clear from the code thatc1-clone() creates a clone of c1 whose type is Child1* and clone() returns a pointer of type Base* (after upcasting from Child1*), which you're trying to down-cast to Child2*. The cast should fail if you use proper cast : dynamic_cast.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the hint, I've read about C++-style casting, and sometimes used it, but this is the first time it would actually show a bug. So maybe I must start using it more often :). –  mmm Oct 14 '11 at 9:22

The clone() patterns allows you to create a valid copy/clone of the object of a child class having just the base reference, e.g. in your case it allows you to do the following:

Base* basePtr = getBaseOrSomeDerivedObject();
Base* copy = basePtr.clone(); // Create a copy that is an object of an actual basePtr's type.

What you could need is a "copy-constructor" that allows you to copy from a base class, e.g.:

class Base {
public:
    // [...]    
    Base(const Base& other) : a(other.a + 1)
    {
        p_int = new int(*(other.p_int));
    }
    // [...]
};


class Child2 : public Base {
public:
    // [...]
    Child2(const Base& base) : Base(base) {}
    // [...]
};

int main() {
    // [...]
    c2 = new Child2(*c1);
    c2->print();
}

Result:

Child1: 7275360:4 0
Child2: 7340936:4 1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for a detailed example, if I could only mark two answers best... :) –  mmm Oct 14 '11 at 10:45

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