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I'm trying to write out a grayscale image using Lockbits, my current code looks is

/// <summary>
/// Save the content of the FrameProc out to a bitmap
/// </summary>
public void Save(string path)
{
    Bitmap bmp = new Bitmap(this.size.Width, this.size.Height
                           ,PixelFormat.Format32bppRgb);
    var data = bmp.LockBits(this.size, ImageLockMode.WriteOnly, bmp.PixelFormat);

    unsafe
    {
        for (int y = 0; y < this.size.Height; y++)
        {
            byte* row = (byte*)data.Scan0 + (y * data.Stride);
            for (int x = 0; x < this.size.Width; x++)
            {
                byte value = (byte)this.buffer[y, x];
                row[x*Bits+r] = value; 
                row[x*Bits+g] = value;
                row[x*Bits+b] = value;
            }
        }
    }

    bmp.UnlockBits(data);
    bmp.Save(path, ImageFormat.Bmp);
}

where

/// <summary>
/// The amount of Bytes per pixel in the image
/// </summary>
private const int Bits = 4;

/// <summary>
/// Image components
/// </summary>
private const int a=3, r = 2, g = 1, b = 0;

However the image i receive is not correct:

Broken image

Maybe this is related to how i'm reading them in? So here's that code

    public FrameProc(Bitmap bmp)
    {
        this.size=new Rectangle(new Point(0,0), bmp.Size);
        var data = bmp.LockBits(this.size
                               ,ImageLockMode.ReadOnly
                               ,bmp.PixelFormat);
        this.buffer = new Matrix(this.size.Height, this.size.Width);

        unsafe
        {
            for (int y = 0; y < this.size.Height; y++)
            {
                byte* row = (byte*)data.Scan0 + (y * data.Stride);
                for (int x = 0; x < this.size.Width; x++)
                {
                    this.buffer[y,x] = 0.299*row[x*Bytes+r] 
                                     + 0.587*row[x*Bytes+g] 
                                     + 0.114*row[x*Bytes+b];
                }
            }
        }

        bmp.UnlockBits(data);
    }
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1  
I'm not sure your choice of image will be to everyone's taste. –  spender Oct 14 '11 at 9:08
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From the results you're getting - it looks exactly as if each pixel is three bytes big and not four as you have declared it - and as one would expect. (Note: you called it Bits - but that's wrong - it should be namned Bytes, not Bits).

I'd experiment with any one of this:

  • change from 4 to 3 bytes
  • change from Format32bppRgb to Format32bppArgb and fill out the alpha with 255
  • change from 4 to 3 bytes and from Format32bppRgb to from Format24bppRgb

I would also rewrite the loop slightly for performance (sorry, I can't help myself):

for (int x = 0; x < this.size.Width; x++, row += Bits) 
                { 
                    byte value = (byte)this.buffer[y, x]; 
                    row[r] = value;  
                    row[g] = value; 
                    row[b] = value; 
                } 

But were you really would get more speed if you get a pointer to this.buffer using the fixed keyword. Yes, you're not having any performance problems, but I couldn't help myself from mentioning it!

share|improve this answer
    
That loop would skyp 3 bytes at a time, the image would end up with holes. Row is 3 times larger than this.buffer, since buffer only holds only Y and row the RGBx values. –  Phyx Oct 14 '11 at 9:31
    
Yes exactly - you increment row INSTEAD of doing the unnecessary x*Bits multiplication on each round. Believe me, I do image processing and .LockBita a lot. But i never ever used the Format32bppRgb format. –  Dan Byström Oct 14 '11 at 9:36
    
oh right, i saw the row += Bits as x += Bits, –  Phyx Oct 14 '11 at 9:46
1  
I know this is old, but I wanted to add this comment for people who find this question through Google (like me): You could try dividing PixelFormat.BitsPerPixel by 8 to get the desired result. Source: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Peter W. Mar 28 '12 at 16:44
1  
@Vlad L You would surrond the code with a "fixed ( byte* pbuffer = this.buffer )" and then you would use pbuffer instead of this.buffer in the loop. Note that you cannot do the double indexing [x,y] then, but have to figure out how to do it in another way... ;-) –  Dan Byström Feb 4 '13 at 12:25
show 4 more comments

Use this function indeed:

public Bitmap MakeGrayscale(Bitmap original)
{
   unsafe
   {
      //create an empty bitmap the same size as original
      Bitmap newBitmap = new Bitmap(original.Width, original.Height);

      //lock the original bitmap in memory
      BitmapData originalData = original.LockBits(
         new Rectangle(0, 0, original.Width, original.Height),
         ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format24bppRgb);

      //lock the new bitmap in memory
      BitmapData newData = newBitmap.LockBits(
         new Rectangle(0, 0, original.Width, original.Height), 
         ImageLockMode.WriteOnly, PixelFormat.Format24bppRgb);

      //set the number of bytes per pixel
      // here is set to 3 because I use an Image with 24bpp
      int pixelSize = 3;

      for (int y = 0; y < original.Height; y++)
      {
         //get the data from the original image
         byte* oRow = (byte*)originalData.Scan0 + (y * originalData.Stride);

         //get the data from the new image
         byte* nRow = (byte*)newData.Scan0 + (y * newData.Stride);

         for (int x = 0; x < original.Width; x++)
         {
            //create the grayscale version
            byte grayScale = 
               (byte)((oRow[x * pixelSize] * .11) + //B
               (oRow[x * pixelSize + 1] * .59) +  //G
               (oRow[x * pixelSize + 2] * .3)); //R

            //set the new image's pixel to the grayscale version
            nRow[x * pixelSize] = grayScale; //B
            nRow[x * pixelSize + 1] = grayScale; //G
            nRow[x * pixelSize + 2] = grayScale; //R
         }
      }

      //unlock the bitmaps
      newBitmap.UnlockBits(newData);
      original.UnlockBits(originalData);

      return newBitmap;
   }
}

Source and other interesting examples (with theory behind) could be taken from here

share|improve this answer
    
The actual operation I'm trying to do isn't just converting the image to grayscale. I'm doing image processing on the byteof the image where converting to grayscale is just the first step. So I do need to do operations that can't be covered by a ColorMatrix. –  Phyx Oct 14 '11 at 9:20
    
@Phyx: on link I posted in my answer you find a function MakeGrayScale using LockBits: take a look at that. –  Marco Oct 14 '11 at 9:24
    
@Phyx: I've just edited my answer writing the function found in that link –  Marco Oct 14 '11 at 9:28
    
I don't actually see a difference between that code and mine, except I temporarily store the pixels somewhere and this code directly converts to grayscale –  Phyx Oct 14 '11 at 9:44
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