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In terms of performance, what would work faster? Is there a difference? Is it platform dependent?

//1. Using vector<string>::iterator:
vector<string> vs = GetVector();

for(vector<string>::iterator it = vs.begin(); it != vs.end(); ++it)
{
   *it = "Am I faster?";
}

//2. Using size_t index:
for(size_t i = 0; i < vs.size(); ++i)
{
   //One option:
   vs.at(i) = "Am I faster?";
   //Another option:
   vs[i] = "Am I faster?";
}
share|improve this question
6  
I have been doing benchmarks myself, and vector.at is much slower than using an iterator, however using vector[i] is much faster than using an iterator. However, you can make the loop even faster by grabbing the pointer to the first element and looping while the current pointer is less than or equal to the pointer of the last element; similar to iterators, but less overhead and is consequently not as nice to look at code-wise. This test was done on Windows with Visual Studio 2008. Concerning your question, I do believe that's platform dependent, it depends on the implementation. – leetNightshade Feb 27 '12 at 17:35
1  
However, continuing from my off topic point about iterating the pointers yourself, should always be faster no matter the platform. – leetNightshade Feb 27 '12 at 17:36
    
@leetNightshade: Certain compilers, when running into subscripts instead of a pointer arithmetics, could use SIMD instructions, which would make it faster. – user405725 Apr 13 '13 at 3:14
1  
You are instantiating the end iterator every time you loop, and iterator instantiation aren't free. Try caching your end iterator. Try this: for(vector<int>::iterator it = v.begin(), end= v.end(); it != end; ++it) { ... } – mchiasson Mar 15 '15 at 12:40

16 Answers 16

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Why not write a test and find out?

Edit: My bad - I thought I was timing the optimised version but wasn't. On my machine, compiled with g++ -O2, the iterator version is slightly slower than the operator[] version, but probably not significantly so.

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    const int BIG = 20000000;
    vector <int> v;
    for ( int i = 0; i < BIG; i++ ) {
        v.push_back( i );
    }

    int now = time(0);
    cout << "start" << endl;
    int n = 0;
    for(vector<int>::iterator it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); ++it) {
        n += *it;
    }

    cout << time(0) - now << endl;
    now = time(0);
    for(size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i) {
        n += v[i];
    }
    cout << time(0) - now << endl;

    return n != 0;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Did you test with full optimisation and try it with both the iterator version first and with the array version first? There may be a slight difference in performance but 2x? Not a chance. – James Hopkin Apr 22 '09 at 11:17
5  
in my tests (using "time" shell builtin and all cout's disabled and one test commented out each time) both versions are equally fast (changed the code so it allocates in the constructor, each element has value "2"). actually the time changes in each test with around 10ms, which i suspect is because of the non-determinism of memory allocation. and sometimes the one, and sometimes the other test is 10ms faster than the other. – Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 22 '09 at 12:38
1  
@litb - yes, I suspect the slight differences on my machine may be due to its lack of memory. I didn't mean to imply the difference was significant. – anon Apr 22 '09 at 12:48
3  
@anon: It's not about higher resolution. It's about using clock() rather than time() to explicitly ignore "all the other activities that can be gonig on in a modern OS while your code runs". clock() measures CPU time used for that process alone. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 5 '11 at 19:20
2  
You are instantiating the end iterator every time you loop, and iterator instantiation aren't free. Try caching your end iterator. Try this: for(vector<int>::iterator it = v.begin(), end= v.end(); it != end; ++it) { ... } – mchiasson Mar 15 '15 at 12:41

Using an iterator results in incrementing a pointer (for incrementing) and for dereferencing into dereferencing a pointer.
With an index, incrementing should be equally fast, but looking up an element involves an addition (data pointer+index) and dereferencing that pointer, but the difference should be marginal.
at() also checks if the index is within the bounds, so it could be slower.

Benchmark results for 500M iterations, vector size 10, with gcc 4.3.3 (-O3), linux 2.6.29.1 x86_64:
at(): 9158ms
operator[]: 4269ms
iterator: 3914ms

YMMV, but if using an index makes the code more readable/understandable, you should do it.

share|improve this answer
2  
-1 sorry. If you look here: velocityreviews.com/forums/…, you'll see that this guy didn't use any compiler optimisation flags, so the results are essentially meaningless. – j_random_hacker Apr 22 '09 at 11:12
1  
-1 Agree with j_random_hacker - if you read the thread all the way through, there's some interesting stuff about the pitfalls of profiling, and also some more reliable results. – James Hopkin Apr 22 '09 at 11:14
1  
-1, indeed. Quoting numbers without understanding them seems to be a trap that got both tstennner and the bencmarker. – MSalters Apr 22 '09 at 11:15
2  
+2 now that you've updated with more sensible measuring criteria :) – j_random_hacker Apr 22 '09 at 16:55
1  
@Michael at() performs bounds checking, so it's data[i] vs. if(i<length) data[i] – tstenner Mar 16 '15 at 21:14

If you don't need indexing, don't use it. The iterator concept is there for your best. Iterators are very easy to optimize, while direct access needs some extra knowledge.

Indexing is meant for direct access. The brackets and the at method do this. at will, unlike [], check for out of bounds indexing, so it will be slower.

The credo is: don't ask for what you don't need. Then the compiler won't charge you for what you don't use.

share|improve this answer

Since you're looking at efficiency, you should realise that the following variations are potentially more efficient:

//1. Using vector<string>::iterator:

vector<string> vs = GetVector();
for(vector<string>::iterator it = vs.begin(), end = vs.end(); it != end; ++it)
{
   //...
}

//2. Using size_t index:

vector<string> vs = GetVector();
for(size_t i = 0, size = vs.size(); i != size; ++i)
{
   //...
}

since the end/size function is only called once rather than every time through the loop. It's likely that the compiler will inline these functions anyway, but this way makes sure.

share|improve this answer
    
The question isn't about how to write efficient code, it is about iterators vs. indexes, but thanks for the input – Gal Goldman Apr 22 '09 at 12:55
    
Finally! the right answer on how to profile this correctly. – mchiasson Mar 15 '15 at 12:42
    
@GalGoldman Unfortunately, if you don't cache your end iterator, the iterator way has an unfair disadvantage over the [] way. Iterators are expensive to instantiate. This is also why I tend to use while loops instead of for loops when I use iterators. It forces me to cache my iterators. – mchiasson Mar 15 '15 at 12:45

As everyone else here is saying, do benchmarks.

Having said that, I would argue that the iterator is faster since at() does range checking as well, i.e. it throws an out_of_range exception if the index is out of bounds. That check itself propbably incurrs some overhead.

share|improve this answer

I would guess the first variant is faster.

But it's implementation dependent. To be sure you should profile your own code.

Why profile your own code?

Because these factors will all vary the results:

  • Which OS
  • Which compiler
  • Which implementation of STL was being used
  • Were optimizations turned on?
  • ... (other factors)
share|improve this answer
    
Also highly important: the surrounding code that the STL container accesses are being inlined into could favour one approach vs. another for some compilers and target platforms. (OS is least likely to matter, but target architecture may matter). Obviously optimizations need to be on for it to be worth discussing: un-optimized STL C++ is not worth considering. – Peter Cordes Apr 18 at 16:50

The first one will be faster in debug mode because index access creates iterators behind the scene, but in release mode where everything should be inlined, the difference should be negligible or null

share|improve this answer

You can use this test code and compare results! Dio it!

#include <vector> 
#include <iostream> 
#include <ctime> 
using namespace std;; 


struct AAA{
    int n;
    string str;
};
int main() { 
    const int BIG = 5000000; 
    vector <AAA> v; 
    for ( int i = 0; i < BIG; i++ ) { 
        AAA a = {i, "aaa"};
        v.push_back( a ); 
    } 

    clock_t now;
    cout << "start" << endl; 
    int n = 0; 
    now = clock(); 
    for(vector<AAA>::iterator it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); ++it) { 
        n += it->n; 
    } 
   cout << clock() - now << endl; 

    n = 0;
    now = clock(); 
    for(size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i) { 
        n += v[i].n; 
    } 
    cout << clock() - now << endl; 

    getchar();
    return n != 0; 
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
Uhm … that’s not really all that different form Neil’s code. Why bother posting it? – Konrad Rudolph Feb 12 '10 at 10:11
1  
You are instantiating the end iterator every time you loop, and iterator instantiation aren't free. Try caching your end iterator. Try this: for(vector<AAA>::iterator it = v.begin(), end= v.end(); it != end; ++it) { ... } – mchiasson Mar 15 '15 at 12:46

It really depends on what you are doing, but if you have to keep re-declaring the iterator, Iterators become MARGINALLY SLOWER. In my tests, the fastest possible iteration would be to declare a simple * to your vectors array and Iterate through that.

for example:

Vector Iteration and pulling two functions per pass.

vector<MyTpe> avector(128);
vector<MyTpe>::iterator B=avector.begin();
vector<MyTpe>::iterator E=avector.end()-1;
for(int i=0; i<1024; ++i){
 B=avector.begin();
   while(B!=E)
   {
       float t=B->GetVal(Val1,12,Val2); float h=B->GetVal(Val1,12,Val2);
    ++B;
  }}

Vector Took 90 clicks (0.090000 seconds)

But if you did it with pointers...

for(int i=0; i<1024; ++i){
MyTpe *P=&(avector[0]);
   for(int i=0; i<avector.size(); ++i)
   {
   float t=P->GetVal(Val1,12,Val2); float h=P->GetVal(Val1,12,Val2);
   }}

Vector Took 18 clicks (0.018000 Seconds)

Which is roughly equivalent to...

MyTpe Array[128];
for(int i=0; i<1024; ++i)
{
   for(int p=0; p<128; ++p){
    float t=Array[p].GetVal(Val1, 12, Val2); float h=Array[p].GetVal(Val2,12,Val2);
    }}

Array Took 15 clicks (0.015000 seconds).

If you eliminate the call to avector.size(), the time becomes the same.

Finally, calling with [ ]

for(int i=0; i<1024; ++i){
   for(int i=0; i<avector.size(); ++i){
   float t=avector[i].GetVal(Val1,12,Val2); float h=avector[i].GetVal(Val1,12,Val2);
   }}

Vector Took 33 clicks (0.033000 seconds)

Timed with clock()

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for caching your end iterator in your example. – mchiasson Mar 15 '15 at 12:48

If you are using VisualStudio 2005 or 2008, to get the best performance out of the vector you'll need to define _SECURE_SCL=0

By default _SECURE_SCL is on which makes iterating over a contain significantly slower. That said leave it on in debug builds, it will make tracking down any errors much easier. One word of caution, since the macro changes the size of iterators and containers, you'll have to be consistent across all compilation units that share a stl container.

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I think the only answer could be a test on your platform. Generally the only thing which is standardized in the STL is the type of iterators a collection offers and the complexity of algorithms.

I would say that there is no (not much of a difference) between those two versions- the only difference I could think of would be tjat the code has to iterate through the whole collection when it has to compute the length of an array (I'm not sure if the length is stored in a variable inside the vector, then the overhead wouldn't matter)

Accessing the elements with "at" should take a little bit longer than directly accessing it with [] because it checks if you are in the bounds of the vector and throws an exception if you are out of bounds (it seems [] is normally just using pointer arithmetic - so it should be faster)

share|improve this answer

I found this thread now when trying to optimize my OpenGL code and wanted to share my results even though the thread is old.

Background: I have 4 vectors, sizes ranging from 6 to 12. Write happens only once at the beginning of the code and read occurs for each of the elements in the vectors every 0.1 milliseconds

The following is the stripped down version of the code used first:

for(vector<T>::iterator it = someVector.begin(); it < someVector.end(); it++)
{
    T a = *it;

    // Various other operations
}

The frame rate using this method was about 7 frames per second (fps).

However, when I changed the code to the following, the frame rate almost doubled to 15fps.

for(size_t index = 0; index < someVector.size(); ++index)
{
    T a = someVector[index];

    // Various other operations
}
share|improve this answer
    
Have you tried pre-incrementing the iterator instead? Since post-inc requires an extra copy step this might have an influence. – Mike Lischke May 3 '13 at 8:26
1  
You are instantiating the end iterator every time you loop, and iterator instantiation aren't free. Try caching your end iterator. Try this: for(vector<T>::iterator it = someVector.begin(), end = someVector.end(); it != end; ++it) { ... } – mchiasson Mar 15 '15 at 12:47

The difference should be negligible. std::vector guarantees that its elements are laid out consecutively in memory. Therefore, most stl implementations implement iterators into std::vector as a plain pointer. With this is mind, the only difference between the two versions should be that the first one increments a pointer, and in the second increments an index which is then added to a pointer. So my guess would be the second one is maybe one extremly fast (in terms of cycles) machine instruction more.

Try and check the machine code your compiler produces.

In general, however, the advice would be to profile if it really matters. Thinking about this kind of question prematurely usually does not give you too much back. Usually, your code's hotspots will be elsewhere where you might not suspect it at first sight.

share|improve this answer
    
there is an noticeable overhead when instantiating iterators. Depends how many elements you're dealing with. As long as the iterators are cached, the cost should be minimal. I also recommend avoiding the iterator way when dealing with recursive functions for that reason. – mchiasson Mar 15 '15 at 12:54

Here's a code I wrote, compiled in Code::Blocks v12.11, using the default mingw compiler. This creates a huge vector, then accesses each element by using iterators, at(), and index. Each is looped once by calling the last element by function, and once by saving the last element to temporary memory.

Timing is done using GetTickCount.

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << "~~ Vector access speed test ~~" << endl << endl;
    cout << "~ Initialization ~" << endl;
    long long t;
    int a;
    vector <int> test (0);
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; i++)
    {
        test.push_back(i);
    }
    cout << "~ Initialization complete ~" << endl << endl;


    cout << "     iterator test: ";
    t = GetTickCount();
    for (vector<int>::iterator it = test.begin(); it < test.end(); it++)
    {
        a = *it;
    }
    cout << GetTickCount() - t << endl;



    cout << "Optimised iterator: ";
    t=GetTickCount();
    vector<int>::iterator endofv = test.end();
    for (vector<int>::iterator it = test.begin(); it < endofv; it++)
    {
        a = *it;
    }
    cout << GetTickCount() - t << endl;



    cout << "                At: ";
    t=GetTickCount();
    for (int i = 0; i < test.size(); i++)
    {
        a = test.at(i);
    }
    cout << GetTickCount() - t << endl;



    cout << "      Optimised at: ";
    t = GetTickCount();
    int endof = test.size();
    for (int i = 0; i < endof; i++)
    {
        a = test.at(i);
    }
    cout << GetTickCount() - t << endl;



    cout << "             Index: ";
    t=GetTickCount();
    for (int i = 0; i < test.size(); i++)
    {
        a = test[i];
    }
    cout << GetTickCount() - t << endl;



    cout << "   Optimised Index: ";
    t = GetTickCount();
    int endofvec = test.size();
    for (int i = 0; i < endofvec; i++)
    {
        a = test[i];
    }
    cout << GetTickCount() - t << endl;

    cin.ignore();
}

Based on this, I personally got that "optimised" versions are faster than "non-optimised" Iterators are slower than vector.at() which is slower than direct indices.

I suggest you compile and run the code for yourselves.

EDIT: This code was written back when I had less experience with C/C++. A further test case should be to use prefix increment operators instead of postfix. That should better the running time.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for caching your end iterators – mchiasson Mar 15 '15 at 12:49

It depends.

The answer is much more subtle than the existing answers show.

at is always slower than iterators or operator[].
But for operator[] vs. iterators, it depends on:

  1. How exactly you're using operator[].

  2. Whether your particular CPU has index registers (ESI/EDI on x86).

  3. How much other code also uses the same index passed to operator[].
    (e.g., are you indexing through multiple arrays in lockstep?)

Here's why:

  1. If you do something like

    std::vector<unsigned char> a, b;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        a[13 * i] = b[37 * i];
    }
    

    Then this code will likely be much slower than the iterator version, since it performs a multiplication operation at each iteration of the loop!

    Similarly, if you do something like:

    struct T { unsigned char a[37]; };
    std::vector<T> a;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        a[i] = foo(i);
    }
    

    Then this will probably also be slower than the iterator version, because sizeof(T) is not a power of 2, and therefore you are (again) multiplying by 37 each time you loop!

  2. If your CPU has index registers, then your code can perform as well or even better with indices rather than with iterators, if using the index register frees up another register for use in the loop. This is not something you can tell just by looking; you'd have to profile the code and/or disassemble it.

  3. If multiple arrays can share the same index, then the code only has to increment one index instead of incrementing multiple iterators, which reduces writes to memory and thus generally increases performance. However, if you're only iterating over a single array, then an iterator may very well be faster, since it avoids the need to add an offset to an existing base pointer.

In general, you should prefer iterators to indices, and indices to pointers, until and unless you face a bottleneck that profiling shows it will be beneficial to switch, because iterators are general-purpose and already likely to be the fastest approach; they don't require the data to be randomly-addressable, which allows you to swap containers if necessary. Indices are the next preferred tool, as they still don't require direct access to the data -- they are invalidated less frequently, and you can e.g. substitute a deque for a vector without any problems. Pointers should be a last resort, and they will only prove beneficial if iterators aren't already degenerating to potiners in release mode.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not index registers, it's indexed addressing modes like [rax + rcx*4] that lets the compiler increment one index instead of incrementing multiple pointers. It doesn't free up registers, though. You still need a register for every base pointer. If anything it will use an extra register. (A pointer-increment loop could spill an end pointer, and compare against it in memory for an end condition, instead of keeping a loop counter in a reg at all.) – Peter Cordes Apr 18 at 16:54
    
re: multiply: compilers are smart enough to do the strength-reduction optimization. You should get an increment by 37 for either loop, instead of a multiply of the loop counter. On some CPUs, multiply is slow-ish. On modern Intel CPUs, imul r32, r32, imm32 is 1 uop, 3c latency, one per 1c throughput. So it's quite cheap. gcc should probably stop breaking down multiplies by small constants into multiple LEA instructions if it takes more than one, esp. with -mtune=haswell or other recent Intel CPU. – Peter Cordes Apr 18 at 17:01

When I was working on a project using C++98 I realized that browsing a std::vector<physics_particle> (in my case) is so slow when using index. After a bit of search I found that in C++98 STL library when you use index vector[index] an iterator starts from the beginning of the vector until he reaches the position number index, but when using iterator he just jumps a step each time, only when you call it = it.next() or it++. For that reason iterators are made, so keep in mind iterators are a solution for navigating a std::vector, so they are the fastest way, and about at() function, it was added to library for safety as it checks for bounds before access.

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