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I have the following query that I am running on my database server but it takes about 30 seconds to run and I can't work out why this is.

SELECT *
FROM [dbo].[PackageInstance] AS packInst
  INNER JOIN [dbo].[PackageDefinition] AS packageDef 
    ON packInst.[PackageDefinitionID] = packageDef.[PackageDefinitionID]
  LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[PackageInstanceContextDef] AS contextDef 
   ON packInst.[PackageInstanceID] = contextDef.[PackageInstanceID]

This produced the following execution plan which to me looks to be good....so I can't understand why it takes so much time to execute where the resulting data is only 100,000 records (which should be a walk in the park for SQL Server).

SQL Server Execution Plan

Any ideas what could be causing this long execution time?

I have looked at the query in Profiler to see what the stats where on it and they are as follows:

CPU - 4711
Reads - 744453
Writes - 9
Duration - 26329

The following are the table definitions:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[PackageDefinition](
    [PackageDefinitionID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [ts] [timestamp] NOT NULL,
    [ProgramID] [int] NULL,
    [VendorID] [int] NULL,
    [PackageExecutionTypeID] [int] NULL,
    [PackageDefinitionStatusID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [IsInternal] [bit] NOT NULL,
    [Name] [dbo].[D_Name] NOT NULL,
    [Description] [dbo].[D_Description] NOT NULL,
    [CreatedDate] [datetime] NOT NULL,
    [PublishedDate] [datetime] NULL,
    [OwnerUserGuid] [uniqueidentifier] NOT NULL,
    [ProcessDefinitionMainID] [int] NULL,
    [KeyInfoHtml] [nvarchar](max) NULL,
    [DescriptionHtml] [nvarchar](max) NULL,
    [WhatToExpectHtml] [nvarchar](max) NULL,
    [BestPracticesHtml] [nvarchar](max) NULL,
    [RecommendedJourneysHtml] [nvarchar](max) NULL,
    [RequiresSLAAgreement] [bit] NOT NULL,
    [SLAFileAssetID] [int] NULL,
    [ImageDataID] [int] NULL,
    [VideoHtml] [nvarchar](max) NULL,
    [VideoAssetID] [int] NULL,
    [UseMapCosts] [bit] NOT NULL,
    [CostMin] [money] NOT NULL,
    [CostMax] [money] NOT NULL,
    [LandingPageVisitCount] [int] NOT NULL,
    [IsDeleted] [dbo].[D_IsDeleted] NOT NULL,
    [CreatedByUserGuid] [uniqueidentifier] NOT NULL,
    [OrderHtml] [nvarchar](max) NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_PackageDefinition] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [PackageDefinitionID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[PackageInstance](
    [PackageInstanceID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [ts] [timestamp] NOT NULL,
    [PackageDefinitionID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [PackageStatusID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [Name] [dbo].[D_Description] NOT NULL,
    [CampaignID] [int] NULL,
    [MarketingPlanID] [int] NULL,
    [CountryID] [int] NULL,
    [DateEntered] [datetime] NULL,
    [DateExecuted] [datetime] NULL,
    [ProcessID] [int] NULL,
    [OrderedByUserGuid] [uniqueidentifier] NULL,
    [RequestedByUserGuid] [uniqueidentifier] NULL,
    [SLAEndDate] [datetime] NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_PackageInstance] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [PackageInstanceID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[PackageInstanceContextDef](
    [PackageInstanceContextDefID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [ts] [timestamp] NOT NULL,
    [PackageInstanceID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [ContextObjectDefID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [EnteredFieldValue] [varchar](max) NULL,
    [SelectedListValueID] [int] NULL,
    [AssetIdsString] [nvarchar](max) NULL,
    [SelectedListValueIdsString] [nvarchar](max) NULL,
    [ContextObjectFieldName] [nvarchar](30) NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_PackageInstanceContextDef] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [PackageInstanceContextDefID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
share|improve this question
    
Any CPU/disk contention from other processes? –  Tom Hunter Oct 14 '11 at 10:48
1  
What's the execution count for the index scan on PackageInstanceContextDef? (it's in the tooltip) –  Andomar Oct 14 '11 at 10:52
    
Any sort warnings in Profiler? What if you try at read uncommitted isolation level? Maybe encountering blocking. @Andomar - It will be 1. Merge Join only processes each input once. –  Martin Smith Oct 14 '11 at 10:53
2  
744,453 reads is > 5GB of data. How wide are these rows? Also might you have heavy fragmentation? –  Martin Smith Oct 14 '11 at 11:01
1  
@Penfold - It is all those max columns that are killing performance. There might be something in this article of relevance –  Martin Smith Oct 14 '11 at 11:54

3 Answers 3

Remove the * in SELECT *

It will always scan because you ask for all columns. And do you have clustered indexes?

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunatly what I am trying to do is find out why my Linq-to-Entities query is taking so long so I have no control over which fields I can select so I need them all!! :( In a production version, I would remove the star and add the columns by name. There are clustered indexes on the Primary Key of each of the tables. –  Penfold Oct 14 '11 at 10:54
    
@Penfold: you are asking us to help with a test query then has SELECT *...? –  gbn Oct 14 '11 at 11:15
    
Yes, I could list out every one of the columns if you like but there are a few of them and I didn't think that it would help seeing as I wan't all of them. –  Penfold Oct 14 '11 at 11:17
    
You do not by definintion need all columns as you have joins where the same data is in mulitple coloumns. SELECT * is a SQL antipattern and should never be used in production code. If your ORM can't handle that it is a poor tool and should not be used. –  HLGEM Oct 14 '11 at 15:19
    
@HLGEM I totally agree with you on using SELECT * in production code and that an ORM should be able to restrict the data being returned. However, what I am saying here is not that I want to user SELECT * or that the Entity Framework is not capable of working out what it needs, but rather that I used SELECT * to make the statement easier to view as there would be about 50 columns that the framework returns. –  Penfold Oct 17 '11 at 9:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer turned out to be what @MartinSmith suggested. Because the PackageDefinition table contained about 8 NVARCHAR(MAX) columns, when the resulting join was created and that was over 100k rows, this was causing the varchar(max) values to be re-read over and over and they exist in out of row pages. Hence the large number of logical reads.

Thanks all for your support, just have to figure out to make the entity framework produce the query that I want.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you try my answer? Was curious to know whether retrieving the large columns after the sort operation even at the expense of accessing PackageDefinition twice would improve things? –  Martin Smith Oct 20 '11 at 9:18

What happens if you add the following index...

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX ix ON  PackageDefinition(PackageDefinitionID)

...and try the following to reduce the width of the data going into the sort?

SELECT packInst.*,
       packageDef2.*,
       contextDef.*
FROM   [dbo].[PackageInstance] AS packInst
       INNER MERGE JOIN [dbo].[PackageDefinition] AS packageDef
         ON packInst.[PackageDefinitionID] = packageDef.[PackageDefinitionID]
       LEFT OUTER MERGE JOIN [dbo].[PackageInstanceContextDef] AS contextDef
        ON packInst.[PackageInstanceID] = contextDef.[PackageInstanceID]
       INNER MERGE JOIN [dbo].[PackageDefinition] AS packageDef2
        ON packageDef.[PackageDefinitionID] = packageDef2.[PackageDefinitionID]  

OF course * should not be used as even if you need all columns you definitely won't need the same columns twice as the result of the JOIN but this is just to maintain the semantics of your original query.

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