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I'm creating a dynamic dll to hold custom objects created from my database. I can create the field the way I want, however I don't understand how to call the constructor. For a final generated result, I want:

public class Countries
{
    public Countries() { }
    public static readonly ReferenceObject USA = new ReferenceObject(120);
    public static readonly ReferenceObject CAN = new ReferenceObject(13);
    public static readonly ReferenceObject MEX = new ReferenceObject(65);
    ... //These would be populated from the database
}

what I'm getting is

public class Countries
{
    public Countries() { }
    public static readonly ReferenceObject USA;
    public static readonly ReferenceObject CAN;
    public static readonly ReferenceObject MEX;
    ...
}

How do I set the values to new initialized objects?

AppDomain domain = AppDomain.CurrentDomain;

AssemblyName aName = new AssemblyName("DynamicEnums");
AssemblyBuilder ab = domain.DefineDynamicAssembly(aName, AssemblyBuilderAccess.Save);

ModuleBuilder mb = ab.DefineDynamicModule(aName.Name, aName.Name + ".dll");

foreach(ReferenceType rt in GetTypes())
{
    TypeBuilder tb = mb.DefineType(rt.Name, TypeAttributes.Public);

    foreach (Reference r in GetReferences(rt.ID))
    {
        string name = NameFix(r.Name);

        FieldBuilder fb = tb.DefineField(name, typeof(ReferenceObject), FieldAttributes.Static | FieldAttributes.Public | FieldAttributes.Literal);

        //Call constructor here... how???
    }

    types.Add(tb.CreateType());
}

ab.Save(aName.Name + ".dll");
share|improve this question
    
Perhaps I want to switch them to DefineMethod or DefineProperty here... but the end result is that I want ("120" == Countries.USA) to be true, as well as (Countries.USA == 120) to be true when referenced in my code. –  Ehryk Oct 14 '11 at 11:34
    
ReferenceObject is basically a wrapper for an int that allows it to be compared to an int or string. –  Ehryk Oct 14 '11 at 11:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Bit of a copy-pasta from my answer to your other (very similar) question, but:

AppDomain domain = AppDomain.CurrentDomain;

AssemblyName aName = new AssemblyName("DynamicEnums");
AssemblyBuilder ab = domain.DefineDynamicAssembly(aName, AssemblyBuilderAccess.Save);

ModuleBuilder mb = ab.DefineDynamicModule(aName.Name, aName.Name + ".dll");

// Store a handle to the ReferenceObject(int32 pValue)
// constructor.
ConstructorInfo referenceObjectConstructor = typeof(ReferenceObject).GetConstructor(new[] { typeof(int) });

foreach (ReferenceType rt in GetTypes())
{
    TypeBuilder tb = mb.DefineType(rt.Name, TypeAttributes.Public);

    // Define a static constructor to populate the ReferenceObject
    // fields.
    ConstructorBuilder staticConstructorBuilder = tb.DefineConstructor(MethodAttributes.Public | MethodAttributes.Static, CallingConventions.Standard, Type.EmptyTypes);
    ILGenerator staticConstructorILGenerator = staticConstructorBuilder.GetILGenerator();

    foreach (Reference r in GetReferences(rt.ID))
    {
        string name = r.Abbreviation.Trim();

        // Create a public, static, readonly field to store the
        // named ReferenceObject.
        FieldBuilder referenceObjectField = tb.DefineField(name, typeof(ReferenceObject), FieldAttributes.Static | FieldAttributes.Public | FieldAttributes.InitOnly);

        // Add code to the static constructor to populate the
        // ReferenceObject field:

        // Load the ReferenceObject's ID value onto the stack as a
        // literal 4-byte integer (Int32).
        staticConstructorILGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Ldc_I4, r.ID);

        // Create a reference to a new ReferenceObject on the stack
        // by calling the ReferenceObject(int32 pValue) reference
        // we created earlier.
        staticConstructorILGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Newobj, referenceObjectConstructor);

        // Store the ReferenceObject reference to the static
        // ReferenceObject field.
        staticConstructorILGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Stsfld, referenceObjectField);
    }

    // Finish the static constructor.
    staticConstructorILGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);

    tb.CreateType();
}

ab.Save(aName.Name + ".dll");
share|improve this answer

When one writes a C# class where fields are initialized like in your example, what the compiler does is generate initialization code in the constructor.

This is what I think you should do: use TypeBuilder.DefineConstructor to generate a constructor and, inside, create code to set the fields.

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