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Currently I have a drop down menu setup for my website as follows:

HTML:

<ul class="primary-navigation">
    <li><a href="/About" id="about"><span>About</span></a></li>
    <li><a href="/Location" id="location"><span>Location</span></a></li>
    <li><a href="/Site-Plan"><span>Site Plan</span></a></li>
    <li><a href="/Specification"><span>Specification</span></a></li>
    <li><a href="/Gallery"><span>Gallery</span></a></li>
    <li><a href="/Investors"><span>Investors</span></a></li>
    <li class="last"><a href="/Contact"><span>Contact</span></a></li>
</ul>
<ul class="secondary-navigation" id="about-menu">
    <li><a href="/Item1">Item1</a></li>
    <li><a href="/Item2">Item2</a></li>
</ul>   
<ul class="secondary-navigation" id="location-menu">
    <li><a href="/Item1">Amenities</a></li>
    <li><a href="/Item2">Connections</a></li>
    <li><a href="/Item3>Location Map</a></li>
</ul>     

Javascript:

$(document).ready(function () {
    // About
    $("#about").hover(
        function() {
            $("#about-menu").css("display","block");
        },
        function() {
            $("#about-menu").css("display","none");
        }
    );
    $("#about-menu").hover(
        function () {
            $(this).css("display", "block");
        },
        function () {
            $(this).css("display", "none");
        }
    );
    $("#about-menu li").hover(
        function () {
            $("#about-menu").css("display", "block");
        },
        function () {
            $("#about-menu").css("display", "none");
        }
    );
    // Location
    $("#location").hover(
        function () {
            $("#location-menu").css("display", "block");
        },
        function () {
            $("#location-menu").css("display", "none");
        }
    );
    $("#location-menu").hover(
        function () {
            $(this).css("display", "block");
        },
        function () {
            $(this).css("display", "none");
        }
    );
});

CSS:

#header ul.primary-navigation { width: 735px; height: 90px; overflow: auto; position:            absolute; top: 0px; right: 0px; background: #FFFFFF; }
#header ul.primary-navigation li { list-style-type: none; width: 104px; height: 89px;    float: left; position: relative; border-right: 1px solid #FFFFFF; background: #b3b3b3; }
#header ul.primary-navigation li:hover { background: #adcc52; }
#header ul.primary-navigation li.last { border-right: 1px solid #b3b3b3; }
#header ul.primary-navigation li.last:hover { background: #adcc52; border-right: 1px solid #adcc52; }
#header ul.primary-navigation li a { display: block; width: 104px; height: 89px; text-decoration: none; }
#header ul.primary-navigation li a span { color: #FFFFFF; display: block; position: absolute; left: 10px; bottom: 10px; }

#header ul.secondary-navigation { width: 735px; display: none; position: absolute; top:  89px; left: 225px; background: red; overflow: auto; }  
#header ul.secondary-navigation li { width: 735px; height: 30px; position: relative; float: left; /*background: #adcc52;*/ }

The navigation appears to be working at first. However it seems that whenever a submenu is active, if you try to hover over anything after the first <li> item, the sub nav disappears. I can't for the life of me figure out why this is happening! You'd think that because the <li> items are nested within a parent <ul>, that they'd all be displaying until you move off the <ul> but it doesn't seem to work that way.

Does anyone know why this is happening?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
Why would the submenu be active, since you move your mouse from the uppermenu? This is why you should when possible have the submenu inside its parent. so you have the ul inside the li –  Marco Johannesen Oct 14 '11 at 12:10
2  
Not an answer, but you should really be using CSS and HTML for basic drop down lists. JavaScript isn't needed unless you want to animate transitions. Can use purecssmenu.com to generate basic structure –  Alex Oct 14 '11 at 12:11
    
Due to the location of the subnav, I'm having to use js.. otherwise yes, I'd try for a pure css menu –  alimac83 Oct 14 '11 at 12:19
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1 Answer

I would say that in

$("#about-menu li").hover(
    function () {
        $("#about-menu").css("display", "block");
    },
    function () {
        $("#about-menu").css("display", "none");
    }
);

When you leave an LI, the second callback is called and the whole menu disappears. Further LIs are not shown and cannot trigger the menu to be shown again. You need to remove this callback.

Another trick, instead of css("display..., just use .show() and .hide()

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks solendil but I already tried this - it didn't work either! –  alimac83 Oct 14 '11 at 12:18
    
I just tested it (with the offending line commented out), and it works in Chrome, see this fiddle : jsfiddle.net/vTcgg –  solendil Oct 14 '11 at 12:32
    
The primary navigation is displaying, yes, but the secondary navigation isn't showing. What /should/ happen is a sub nav drops down below the primary navigation while you're either hovered on the parent or the child item. I hope this makes sense? –  alimac83 Oct 14 '11 at 12:49
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