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In recent years I have been working on web applications written in Java using the Spring MVC framework. The projects have good test coverage with JUnit & Selenium. However on two occasions errors in the Spring Configuration have got through the testing process.

In one case a change was made to a parent bean in controllerContext.xml which also required a change to the two inheriting beans. But the required change was only made to one of the two inheriting beans. The error was only visible in a small, but critical, part of the Web application. Selenium UA tests were later extended to check this directly in the Web App. prior to deployment, but the damage had already been done as the error made it into the live environment.

In another case a property required to set the data format was not being injected properly via the applicationContext.xml. The only visible error was in the date format of a generated report downloaded from the web app. Difficult to test with Selenium.

One of the advantages of using Spring MVC is the ability to set the injected objects in your JUnit tests (i.e. a mock object), but this doesn't tell you what you are actually going to get injected when the Application is running in the live environment.

The answer may be integration testing, however setting up & running integration testing has proved to be difficult in the past ... but that's another question ...

So, I'd be really interested in learning how people have tried to catching possible errors introduced into Spring configuration files.

So my question is:

What is the best way to test for errors in the Spring Configuration?

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Sorry but I don't understand why should we treat spring configuration error as it's some special kind of bug. By the way I don't see any advantages in using bean inheritance if you have only two beans configured with it. As for integration testing, Test Context Framework was designed to help you with that, it's ok to divide your application context to several contexts(which form Config Sets in STS) and run integration tests against real objects, and combine them. –  Boris Treukhov Oct 14 '11 at 13:06
    
@BorisTreukhov I think it is different (but not necessarily in a bad way). The spring configuration seems one step removed from the test code compared to the java code itself. And my direct experience is that errors introduced into the Spring configuration have proved to be more difficult to pick up, so we (I) have been missing something & I'm grateful for all advice. –  rdc Oct 14 '11 at 13:13
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The type of bugs you describe will only be caught by tests when someone thinks/remembers to test these conditions:

In one case a change was made to a parent bean in controllerContext.xml which also required a change to the two inheriting beans. But the required change was only made to one of the two inheriting beans. The error was only visible in a small, but critical, part of the Web application. Selenium UA tests were later extended to check this directly in the Web App. prior to deployment, but the damage had already been done as the error made it into the live environment.

In another case a property required to set the data format was not being injected properly via the applicationContext.xml. The only visible error was in the date format of a generated report downloaded from the web app. Difficult to test with Selenium.

In both cases you have a developer who made a change without verifying that everywhere that change affects does not have errors. How can you catch this type of mistake in a JUnit-style test, without relying on the person making the change to explicitly add a test for the mistake they are making? In other words, you can only catch these types of bugs when you remember to test for them.

Personally I think the best approach for catching mistakes like this is more Selenium-like tests that actually invoke the application and assert the correct behavior.

But if your tests don't know the correct behavior to test, you can't catch mistakes like this - catching the mistakes requires you to first realize what mistakes need to be caught.

In other words - you can't test that the correct values are injected without the test knowing what the correct values are. These tests won't catch scenarios where what someone thinks the correct value is is actually incorrect.

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I think that you understand what I was trying to ask. And I think you have come to a similar conclusion to me, that Selenium-style tests of the working application (perhaps in a staging environment) are the way to catch this sort of thing - unfortunately this sort of testing can be left until late in the development process. –  rdc Oct 16 '11 at 21:57
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This test case will do the magic

import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;
import org.springframework.test.context.ContextConfiguration;
import org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringJUnit4ClassRunner;


@ContextConfiguration(locations={"/server-application-context.xml"})
@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
public class SpringConfigurationTest {

    @Test
    public void testSpringConfiguration() {
    }
}
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Thanks for posting this code. Would it test the syntax of the applicationContext.xml? –  rdc Oct 16 '11 at 22:00
    
@rdc: Yes, the code will fail with an error if there is some problem with the configuration (i.e. syntax errors, beans that can't be resolved, anything you'd get during normal startup). –  Aaron Digulla Dec 14 '12 at 13:47
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@ContextConfiguration(..) and @RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class) on your test class

That will load the entire context. You will need a dummy @Test method, so that the context is loaded.

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Yes, this is what we do. It is a sanity check to make sure that the context is correct. If there is a problem, this should give you the same errors that you would get when starting up your container. –  Paul Croarkin Oct 14 '11 at 13:24
    
This is cool. I tried and it works. But there is one problem with this way. If I'm using maven project, my config file will have lot of variables (will be replaced by maven during install). When I run test case variable is not getting replaced properly. So couldn't test. –  Bala Oct 14 '11 at 13:28
1  
that's why I'm not using maven filters to replace properties. I use spring to load them from an external location instead. –  Bozho Oct 14 '11 at 13:29
    
I just figured that I can configure maven profile in my eclipse. Now your approach is completely working for me also... –  Bala Oct 14 '11 at 13:51
1  
this solves the technical problem posed in this question - how to load the Spring context in a JUnit test - but I don't think it solves the people/process part of the question. –  matt b Oct 14 '11 at 14:25
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