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I have a XML file like this:

   <Document>
       <Tests Count="4">
          <Test>
             <Name>test with a</Name>
             <Type>VI test</Type>
             <Result>Pass</Result>
          </Test>
          <Test>
             <Name>test plot</Name>
             <Type>Curve test</Type>
             <Result>Fail</Result>
          </Test>
          <Test>
             <Name>test fixture</Name>
             <Type>Leakage test</Type>
             <Result>Pass</Result>
          </Test>      
          <Test>
             <Name>test fixture</Name>
             <Type>Leakage test</Type>
          </Test>             
        </Tests>
   </Document>

I made a class to contain each "Test" in it:

class TestGroup
{
    public string TestName { get; set; }
    public string TestType { get; set; }
    public string TestResult { get; set; }
}

Since I am very noob at XML, at the moment I get data like this (ztr is XmlDocument):

public List<TestGroup> GetTestGroups()
        {
            List<TestGroup> TestNode = new List<TestGroup>();

            string[] type_t = new string[GetTestsNumber()];
            string[] name_t = new string[GetTestsNumber()];
            string[] result_t = new string[GetTestsNumber()];

            //name
            string xpath = "/Document/Tests/Test";

            int i = 0;

            foreach (XmlElement Name in ztr.SelectNodes(xpath))
            {
                name_t[i] = Name.SelectSingleNode("Name").InnerText;
                i++;
            }
            ///////////

            //result
            xpath = "/Document/Tests/Test";

            i = 0;

            foreach (XmlElement Result in ztr.SelectNodes(xpath))
            {
                result_t[i] = Result.SelectSingleNode("Result").InnerText;
                i++;
            }
            /////////////////
            xpath = "/Document/Tests/Test";

            i = 0;

            foreach (XmlElement Type in ztr.SelectNodes(xpath))
            {
                type_t[i] = Type .SelectSingleNode("Type").InnerText;
                i++;
            }

            int count = type_t.GetLength(0);

            for (i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                LUTestGroup node = new LUTestGroup();
                node.TestName = name_t[i];
                node.TestType = type_t[i];
                node.TestResult = result_t[i];

                TestNode.Add(node);
            }

            return TestNode;
        }

Obviously this way is pretty dangerous. It itterates separate times in the xml time and each time adds one property to the class. Also if you note in the example xml file. the last Test does noet have a Result node so the code I wrote sometimes crashes when I feed in different XML files.

Can you help me please write a method to safely get the List to be filled by all Tests avilable in XML file and if any of them does not have a node, the method would not crash? and must important, does the job in ONE GO!

Thanks

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1  
Do you have to use XmlDocument? LINQ to XML would make it much nicer, if you can use .NET 3.5. –  Jon Skeet Oct 14 '11 at 12:51
    
all my other methods is also based on XmlDocument, at the moment I am not thinking about using LINQ. But would be nice if you give an example for this xml file in LINQ then I will try to make my other methods based on that. –  Saeid Yazdani Oct 14 '11 at 12:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

(As noted in comments.)

The LINQ to XML version is really easy:

// Could use doc.Root.Element("Tests").Elements("Test") to be explicit
return doc.Descendants("Test")
          .Select(x => new LUTestGroup {
                      TestName = (string) x.Element("Name"),
                      TestType = (string) x.Element("Type"),
                      TestResult = (string) x.Element("Result")
                  })
          .ToList();

Note that the cast from XElement to string will return null if you give it a null XElement reference, so in your "leakage test" case, you'd end up with an LUTestGroup with a null TestResult property.

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Can you tell plesae how should "doc" be declared? I have it as "doc = new XPathDocument(filePath);" I guess I should use XDocument, how to define it? –  Saeid Yazdani Oct 14 '11 at 13:16
    
@Sean87: Using XDocument doc = XDocument.Load(filePath); –  Jon Skeet Oct 14 '11 at 13:19

It looks to me like you are doing this the hard way. Let the system parse xml for you! You can annotate classes to tell it what the xml looks like:

[XmlRoot("Document")]
public class TestWrapper {
    private readonly List<TestGroup> tests = new List<TestGroup>();
    [XmlArray("Tests"), XmlArrayItem("Test")]
    public List<TestGroup> Tests { get { return tests; } }
}

public class TestGroup {
    [XmlElement("Name")] public string TestName { get; set; }
    [XmlElement("Type")] public string TestType { get; set; }
    [XmlElement("Result")] public string TestResult { get; set; }
}

then:

TestWrapper doc;
using(var reader = XmlReader.Create(source))
{
    var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof (TestWrapper));
    doc = (TestWrapper) serializer.Deserialize(reader);
}
// et voila; loaded! prove it:
foreach(var item in doc.Tests)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}, {2}",
        item.TestName, item.TestType, item.TestResult);
}

You could also use XmlSerializer to create xml with the same layout, although the (rather redundant, IMO) /Document/Tests/@Count is a pain - I could show you how to fix that if you really needed to.

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Thanks for the tips! I think as Jon said Linq would be the less headache way. –  Saeid Yazdani Oct 14 '11 at 13:26

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