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I'm running a Python script on Windows, and I've noticed that even though the Python process takes ~8% CPU, the associated conhost.exe process takes ~14%.

Why is this so? How come such a large part of the CPU consumption is in the conhost and not in the Python process?
Is there a way to reduce this CPU consumption? (besides optimizing the code of course)

UPDATE 1: Win7 64bit, Python 2.6.6

UPDATE 2: The Python program uses a C++ package via SWIG Python bindings. The C++ package (quickfix) does I/O with the network quite a bit (1), it also prints to the console (2). The Python code prints to several files (3). Which if these three should be suspect?

share|improve this question
    
Which Windows and which Python? – Steven Rumbalski Oct 14 '11 at 20:26
    
And this matters, because...? – Cat Plus Plus Oct 16 '11 at 18:49
    
Does the CPU usage in conhost.exe mostly disappear if you minimize the console window? If so, it may be an issue with the video device driver: for example, if you are using the Microsoft generic drivers console performance is sometimes poor. – Harry Johnston Oct 17 '11 at 0:34
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since we don't know what your program is doing we have to guess a little. So long as there is no I/O I'd expect conhost to consume 0% CPU. So I hypothesise that you are printing a lot of text to the console. For example, the following program has the same symptoms as you report:

while True:
    print "Hello world!"
share|improve this answer
1  
printing to console is only think that should make conhost work – David Heffernan Oct 16 '11 at 18:49
    
Following this answer I found that diverting the output to file reduces conhost.exe's CPU consumption dramatically. So you could script.py > output.txt or even script.py > nul if you don't care to lose the output – Jonathan Oct 17 '11 at 17:19
    
Nice to see my suspicions confirmed. – David Heffernan Oct 17 '11 at 17:20

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