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I am currently working on a C# project where I need to validate the text that a user has entered into a text box.

One of the validations required is that it checks to ensure that an IP address has been entered correctly.

How would I go about doing this validation of the IP address.

Thanks for any help you can provide.

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Regular expressions: \b\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\b –  reggie Oct 14 '11 at 16:07
1  
@reggie: not all those patterns are valid. A/B/C nets etc. –  Henk Holterman Oct 14 '11 at 16:48
1  
Does this need to take into account IP v4 and v6? –  Justin Oct 20 '11 at 16:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

It seems that you are only concerned with validating IPv4 IP Address strings in X.X.X.X format. If so, this code is straight forward for that task:

string ip = "127.0.0.1";
string[] parts = ip.Split('.');
if (parts.Length < 4)
{
    // not a IPv4 string in X.X.X.X format
}
else
{
    foreach(string part in parts)
    {
        byte checkPart = 0;
        if (!byte.TryParse(part, out checkPart))
        {
            // not a valid IPv4 string in X.X.X.X format
        }
    }
    // it is a valid IPv4 string in X.X.X.X format
}
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@Permenion, thanks exactly what I was after. Works perfectly –  Boardy Oct 21 '11 at 8:48

You can use IPAddress.Parse Method .NET Framework 1.1. Or, if you are using .NET 4.0, see documentation for IPAddress.TryParse Method .NET Framework 4.

This method determines if the contents of a string represent a valid IP address. In .NET 1.1, the return value is the IP address. In .NET 4.0, the return value indicates success/failure, and the IP address is returned in the IPAddress passed as an out parameter in the method call.

edit: alright I'll play the game for bounty :) Here's a sample implementation as an extension method, requiring C# 3+ and .NET 4.0:

using System;
using System.Net;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace IPValidator
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main (string[] args)
        {
            Action<string> TestIP = (ip) => Console.Out.WriteLine (ip + " is valid? " + ip.IsValidIP ());

            TestIP ("99");
            TestIP ("99.99.99.99");
            TestIP ("255.255.255.256");
            TestIP ("abc");
            TestIP ("192.168.1.1");
        }

    }

    internal static class IpExtensions
    {
        public static bool IsValidIP (this string address)
        {
            if (!Regex.IsMatch (address, @"\b\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\b"))
                return false;

            IPAddress dummy;
            return IPAddress.TryParse (address, out dummy);
        }
    }
}
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Normally just-a-link answers are wrong but this is very accurate. All the same, summarize in a few lines to make a proper answer. And maybe link to Fx4, –  Henk Holterman Oct 14 '11 at 16:06
    
What kind of summary is necessary? IMO a "google it for me" question gets to do a bit of homework afterwards, since they obviously didn't do any beforehand. Not every answer is completely free. –  insta Oct 14 '11 at 16:14
    
Thanks, this worked sort of. However, when I am entering an IP Address say 127.0.0.1. It says that it is valid before each dot. I.e. If I type 127 it will consider that as valid, when I put 127. this won't be valid again, and when I put 127.0 this will be considered as valid again. This seems a bit strange that its doing this as 127 and 127.0 are not IP addresses –  Boardy Oct 14 '11 at 16:22
2  
Yes they are. Dotted-quad notation is a more human-readable form of raw 32-bit numbers, which is what IP addresses ultimately are. Try ping 134744072. –  insta Oct 14 '11 at 16:50
    
Oh right didn't realise that, is there a way to check to make sure it is in the readable form like a normal IP address, i.e. 127.0.0.1 would be valid but 127 wouldn't be –  Boardy Oct 16 '11 at 19:06

If you want to see if the IP address actually exists, you can use the Ping class.

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1  
Be aware for some stupid design decision, the Ping class will throw an exception if the ping fails for any reason. –  insta Oct 14 '11 at 16:57
1  
And ping can be blocked on existing IPs. –  Jon Hanna Oct 20 '11 at 10:47

insta's answer was closer before he added the incorrect regexp.

public static bool IsValidIP(string ipAddress)
{
  IPAddress unused;
  return IPAddress.TryParse(ipAddress, out unused);
}

Or since the OP doesn't want to include integer IPv4 addresses that aren't full dotted quads:

public static bool IsValidIP(string ipAddress)
{
  IPAddress unused;
  return IPAddress.TryParse(ipAddress, out unused)
    &&
    (
        unused.AddressFamily != AddressFamily.InterNetwork
        ||
        ipAddress.Count(c => c == '.') == 3
    );
}

Testing:

IsValidIP("fe80::202:b3ff:fe1e:8329") returns true (correct).

IsValidIP("127.0.0.1") returns true (correct).

IsValidIP("What's an IP address?") returns false (correct).

IsValidIP("127") returns true with first version, false with second (correct).

IsValidIP("127.0") returns true with first version, false with second (correct).

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Hana, Thanks for your help but this returns the same thing as mentioned before 127.0 comes back as true, which isn't what I want. I would only want the full ip address to be true, i.e. 127.0.0.1 –  Boardy Oct 20 '11 at 14:29
    
@Boardy. Simply enough done. With fe80::202:b3ff:fe1e:8329 though it could as likely be written fe80:0:0:0:202:b3ff:fe1e:8329 and there are several other variants. Not sure what you'd want to do there. –  Jon Hanna Oct 20 '11 at 14:56
    
Further edit: slightly faster and I think a bit clearer on intent of the code. –  Jon Hanna Oct 20 '11 at 14:58
    
LOL. And another because that had silliness. –  Jon Hanna Oct 20 '11 at 14:59

I'd use a regex.

^((25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)\.){3}(25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)$

Using named groups, it could be clearer. It is written in Ruby. I don't know C# but I guess that the regex support is complete in that language and that named groups might exist.

 /(?<number>(25[0-5]|2[0-4]\d|1\d\d|[1-9]\d|\d)){0}^(\g<number>\.){3}\g<number>$/
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Here's my solution:

using System.Net.NetworkInformation;
using System.Net;
    /// <summary>
    /// Return true if the IP address is valid.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="address"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public bool TestIpAddress (string address)
    {
        PingReply reply;
        Ping pingSender = new Ping ();

        try
        {
            reply = pingSender.Send (address);
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            return false;
        }

        return reply.Status == IPStatus.Success;
    }
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