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How important is it to add Launch Images to an iOS application? I assume that these are like a cached file to show on the screen while the application is getting setup, when there might otherwise be nothing to show until it is fully running. Is this right?

If so, what should a launch image be if your app might start in different states, or does this not effect return to foreground when multitasking? If it is only for the very first initial launch of the app, then the launch image should just be the same as whatever graphic normally appears when you first start the app, right?

Apple must not care too much about whether your app actually includes these, since mine never have.

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I don't understand why this question was downgraded. It seems a fair inquiry for anyone new to Xcode or iOS development, and my question is clear. –  OpenLearner Oct 14 '11 at 16:16
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I think the problem here came from the fact that you never specified what platform this was for. Xcode is merely an IDE, and can be used to develop Mac and iOS applications, so it was hard to decipher what you were referring to. I've edited the question to make it more clear. –  Brad Larson Nov 12 '11 at 23:13
    
thank you sir, appreciate it. –  OpenLearner Nov 12 '11 at 23:50
    
I'm sorry but your question could be found from searching or even experienced when developing an app on the simulator. –  The Muffin Man Jun 26 '13 at 22:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Note: as Zev mentions below, the Apple HIG recommendation has changed since I originally answered this question. Apple now recommends that you take all of the static elements of your first screen and make that into your default or launch page. All dynamic elements are to be removed, to give the impression that your app is going through an initialization process -- which in some cases may mean that your default screen is simply a background from your app. Thanks to Zev Eisenberg for pointing that out, "splash" pages are not recommended.

The launch image will show while your app is initializing, it's a good idea to have one. If you don't have one the user is likely to stare at a blank screen while waiting for your app to load. I believe the recommendation is to use an image that looks like the first page of your app. Here is the reference:

http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/UserExperience/Conceptual/MobileHIG/IconsImages/IconsImages.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40006556-CH14-SW5

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thanks for answering, even despite all the unexpected down votes on this question. –  OpenLearner Oct 14 '11 at 16:17
    
You're welcome! –  Alan Moore Oct 14 '11 at 16:43
    
In the document you link, Apple discourages against making a splash screen. If you use an image of the UI, partially loaded, it will make your app seem like it is loading faster than it really is. Look at Apple Notes, for example. The UI seems to load in stages, which you perceive as faster than looking at a blank screen until it is fully loaded. A splash screen defeats the purpose of this illusory “faster” loading. –  Zev Eisenberg May 7 '13 at 23:09
    
I find this is a very valid question. Thanks for asking. –  Sandy Jun 26 '13 at 19:22
    
My question is what if the app wants to show a different first screen on first launch than later launches? (I don't mean foregrounding here, but relaunching). –  Brad Thomas Feb 4 at 18:08

how about if app is starting immediately and no time passed ? what if you see (or cannot see) for a 0.1 sec launch image ? would it be still useful to have two images in main bundle that will never be seen or used ?

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the launch images should look just like your interface so even if they show for a fraction of a second, which they often will during app launch, etc, then there is no visible change between them and the actual interface –  OpenLearner Aug 20 '13 at 0:34

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