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I've got a table Foo with columns A, B, and C. What I need to get out of this is each distinct value of A, and the value of C in with the row that has the greatest B for that A.

If I do this:

select A, max(B)
from Foo
group by A

That gets me the greatest B for each A, and I can run another query based on these results to get the values of C that I need. But I'd like to be able to do this in one query.

One might suggest a subquery in the where clause, but the version of MySQL I'm using does not support that. I cannot update MySQL to a later version. Is there a way I can get what I need in a single query?

I am using MySQL 4.0.27.

share|improve this question
1  
Which version of MySQL is it that you're using? – Sorpigal Oct 14 '11 at 17:40
    
I'm using MySQL 4.0.27. – Syntactic Oct 14 '11 at 19:46
up vote 3 down vote accepted

So you want to to select those rows, for each A, that have the maximum B.
You're almost there -- you just need to join your query back to the original table:

SELECT Foo.* FROM Foo 
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT A, MAX(B) AS MAXB 
    FROM Foo 
    GROUP BY A
) AS Subtable -- your original query
ON Subtable.MAXB = Foo.B and Foo.A = Subtable.A;

Note: Since I don't know what version of MySQL you're using, I can't guarantee this will work on yours.


Update: here are a couple of other examples of replacing subqueries with joins:

example 1
example 2


Second update: due to MySQL compatibility issues, this version moves the subquery, and adds an implicit join, putting the join conditions in a where-clause:

SELECT Foo.* 
FROM 
    Foo, 
    (SELECT A, MAX(B) AS MAXB 
        FROM Foo 
        GROUP BY A
    ) AS Subtable -- your original query
WHERE Subtable.MAXB = Foo.B and Foo.A = Subtable.A;

Source: according to the MySQL manual for 4.0 and 4.1, subqueries are allowed in FROM-clauses -- so hopefully this works on your system.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for neglecting to post the MySQL version earlier. This is a good idea, but doesn't seem to work; this version of MySQL does not like the join against a derived table. – Syntactic Oct 14 '11 at 19:58
    
@Syntactic -- I've edited my answer based on the MySQL manual. – Matt Fenwick Oct 14 '11 at 20:22
    
Looks good. Thanks! – Syntactic Oct 14 '11 at 21:30

Not sure if older MySQL has support for derived tables, but I would use something like this:

SELECT t2.*
FROM (
    SELECT A, max(B) as B
    FROM Foo
    GROUP BY A
) t1
JOIN (
    SELECT A, max(B) as B, C
    FROM Foo
    GROUP BY A, C
) t2 ON t1.A = t2.A AND t1.B = t2.B

The first derived table will limit the second derived table to only the highest value B for each distinct A.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work, unfortunately. This version of MySQL will not join against the result of a select query. – Syntactic Oct 14 '11 at 20:00

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