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Can I use Tie::File with an output file of utf encoding? I can't get this to work right. What I am trying to do is open this utf encoded file, remove the match string from the file and rename the file.

Code:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Tie::File;
use File::Copy;

my ($input_file) = qw (test.txt);

open my $infh, "<:encoding(UTF-16LE)", $input_file or die "cannot open '$input_file': $!";

for (<$infh>) {
    tie my @lines, "Tie::File", $_;
    shift @lines if $lines[0] =~ m/MyHeader/;
    untie @lines;
    my ($name) = /^(.*).csv/i;
    move($_, $name . ".dat");
}

close $infh
    or die "Cannot close '$input_file': $!";

Code: (updated)

my ($input_file) = qw (test.txt);
my $qfn_in = $input_file;
my $qfn_out = $qfn_in . ".dat";

open(my $fh_in, "<:raw:perlio:encoding(UTF-16le):crlf:utf8", $qfn_in)
   or die("Can't open \"$qfn_in\": $!\n");

open(my $fh_out, ">:raw:perlio:encoding(UTF-16le):crlf:utf8", $qfn_out)
   or die("Can't open \"$qfn_out\": $!\n");

while (<$fh_in>) {
   next if $. == 1 && /MyHeader/; 
   print($fh_out $_)
      or die("Can't write to \"$qfn_out\": $!");
}

close($fh_in);
close($fh_out) or die("Can't write to \"$qfn_out\": $!");

rename($qfn_out, $qfn_in)
   or die("Can't rename: $!\n");
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
my $qfn_in = ...;
my $qfn_out = $qfn_in . ".tmp";

open(my $fh_in, "<:raw:perlio:encoding(UTF-16le):crlf:utf8", $qfn_in)
   or die("Can't open \"$qfn_in\": $!\n");

open(my $fh_out, ">:raw:perlio:encoding(UTF-16le):crlf:utf8", $qfn_out)
   or die("Can't open \"$qfn_out\": $!\n");

while (<$fh_in>) {
   next if $. == 1 && /MyHeader/;
   print($fh_out $_)
      or die("Can't write to \"$qfn_out\": $!");
}

close($fh_in);
close($fh_out) or die("Can't write to \"$qfn_out\": $!");

rename($qfn_out, $qfn_in)
   or die("Can't rename: $!\n");

(:perlio and :utf8 are workarounds for bugs that existed back then.)

share|improve this answer
    
lots of good input from all. thanks. –  jdamae Oct 14 '11 at 23:31
    
On what Perl versions do you need (or not need) the workarounds? I would not think to do them. It's annoying enough that you have to do pop the crlf and then put it back. I almost worked this all out a few weeks ago, but can't seem to find my notes. I wish :raw had simply been called :uncrlf. –  tchrist Oct 15 '11 at 2:02
    
@tchrist, I saw someone say :utf8 was needed <= 5.8.8. Dunno about 5.8.9. // :raw removed :perlio until very recently. I don't know if the fix is out of bleed if I'm right about it being fixed. // :bytes would be a better name for :raw undoes :encoding too. –  ikegami Oct 15 '11 at 3:35
    
@tchrist, To be clear "removed :perlio" actually means "disabled buffering". I don't know what visible effect on the layers returned by get_layers. –  ikegami Oct 15 '11 at 3:38
1  
@jdamae, Tie::File edits in place, so I did the same. If you don't want to edit in place, set $qfn_out to the output file and remove the rename. –  ikegami Oct 18 '11 at 21:37
show 5 more comments

This is underdocumented in the Tie::File perldoc, but you want to pass the discipline => ':encoding(UTF-16LE)' option when you tie the file:

tie my @lines, 'Tie::File', $input_file, discipline => ':encoding(UTF-16LE)'

Note that the third argument is the name of the file to associate with the tied array. Tie::File will automatically open and manage the filehandle for you; there is no need to call open on the file yourself.

@lines now contains the contents of the file, so the next thing to do is check the first line:

if ($lines[0] =~ m/pattern/) {
    my $line = shift @lines;
    untie @lines;   # rewrites, closes the file, w/o first line
    my ($name) = $line =~ /^(.*).csv/i;
    rename $input_file, "$name.dat";
}

But I concur with TLP that Tie::File is overkill for this job.

(My previous answer about opening a filehandle with the correct encoding and passing the glob as the third arg to Tie::File won't work, as (1) it didn't open the file in read/write mode and (2) even if it did, Tie::File can't or doesn't apply the encoding on both the reading from and writing to the file handle)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, i tried this too, but am getting these messages: Filehandle $infh opened only for input at /lib/perl5/5.8/Tie/File.pm line 907, <$infh> line 250. Couldn't write record: Bad file descriptor at /lib/perl5/5.8/Tie/File.pm line 907, <$infh> line 250. –  jdamae Oct 14 '11 at 22:15
    
Even my updated answer is pretty dodgy. When Tie::File rewrites the file, I don't know if you can trust it to seek and truncate in the right places. IMHO trying to use Tie::File just makes this problem a lot harder. –  mob Oct 14 '11 at 22:51
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The line:

tie my @lines, "Tie::File", $_;

Tries to tie @lines to a file with the name of each line of test.txt. Since it does not seem to be a file with filenames in it, I suspect that that tie fails.

What you are probably after is using Tie::File on test.txt. If you only want to check the first line of that file, you do not need a loop.

So you'd need something like:

use autodie;  #handy to check for fatal errors
tie my @lines, "Tie::File", $input_file;
shift @lines if $lines[0] =~ /MyHeader/;
untie @lines;
if ($input_file =~ /(.+).csv/i) {
    move($input_file, $1);
}

But there are simpler ways to check the first line of a file. This will check one file:

perl -we '$_=<>; print if /MyHeader/; print <>;' test.txt > test.dat
share|improve this answer
    
so, you mean this tie my @lines, "Tie::File", $input_file;'? I also tried removing the loop. now, i'm getting other messages: Use of uninitialized value in pattern match (m//), Use of uninitialized value in concatenation (.), Use of uninitialized value in -s,rename, string, stat at perl5/5.8/File/Copy.pm –  jdamae Oct 14 '11 at 21:37
    
@jdamae Updated answer. –  TLP Oct 14 '11 at 21:51
    
thanks for your input as well. although, i have to do this file open with the encoding check. that particular check has some other chars before the string. so, i'm still figuring out the messgs with the file handle (see reply to mob's answer) –  jdamae Oct 14 '11 at 22:30
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