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I would like my reg ex to accept characters in the set [a-zA-Z0-9.\?!%, ] and also not except the exact words "not set".

Examples of successful matches:

category1
myCategory
Hello World!!!
notset

Examples of unsuccessful matches:

{empty string}
not set
Not Set
NOT SET
<script>

I am using the .NET framework.

Thanks!

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Why do you throw in a <script> tag, trying to parse html? –  sln Oct 15 '11 at 8:02
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4 Answers 4

Obviosly, you can test for "not set" by code. If it has to be a regex, you can use a negative lookahead:

^(?!not set$)[a-zA-Z0-9.?!%, ]+$

Working Example

A C# code example would be:

Match m = Regex.Match(s, @"^(?!not set$)[a-zA-Z0-9.?!%, ]+$", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
if (m.Success)
{
    // all is well
}

If you want the match to be case insensitive (that is "Not Set" is invalid, but "not set" is valid), use:

Match m = Regex.Match(s, @"^(?!Not Set$)[a-zA-Z0-9.?!%, ]+$");
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Missing a note about case-sensitivity... but +1 (even if I would format it a tad different ;-) –  user166390 Oct 14 '11 at 21:19
1  
This will match 5Q not set TR . –  sln Oct 15 '11 at 8:04
    
@sln - that is left for interpretation. "5Q not set TR" is not "the exact words "not set"", and the examples do not address it. Either way, you can easily change it to ^(?!.*\bnot set\b)[a-zA-Z0-9.?!%, ]+$ –  Kobi Oct 15 '11 at 12:42
    
@sln - "5Q not set TR" is allowed. The only thing is case sensitivity because this matches "Not Set". –  Bob Oct 18 '11 at 18:47
1  
I ended up using ^(?![nN][oO][tT] [sS][eE][tT]$)[a-zA-Z0-9.?!%, ]+$. This did not disable my client side validation. –  Bob Oct 19 '11 at 21:31
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You can try the following code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string str = "NOT SET";

    if (str.ToLower().Equals("not set"))
    {
        // Do Something
    }
    else
    {
        String pattern = @"^[a-z0-9.\?!%,]+$";
        Regex regex = new Regex(pattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

        if (regex.IsMatch(str))
        {
            // Do Something
        }

    }
}
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I would prefer a one liner regular expression that I can plug into my validator. –  Bob Oct 18 '11 at 18:52
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This might work ^(?i:(?!not set)[a-z0-9.\\?!%, ])+$ (untested)

EDIT
Didn't work for me. – Bob 4 hours ago

@Bob - Here are your samples.

Examples of successful matches:

category1
myCategory
Hello World!!!
notset

Examples of unsuccessful matches:

{empty string}
not set
Not Set
NOT SET
<script>

What didn't work?

@samples = (
 'category1',
 'myCategory',
 'Hello World!!!',
 'notset',
 '',
 'not set',
 'Not Set',
 'NOT SET',
 '<script>'
);

for (@samples) {
   print "'$_'";
   if (/^(?i:(?!not set)[a-z0-9.\\?!%, ])+$/) {
      print " - yes matches\n";
   }
   else {
      print " - no\n";
   }
} 

output:

'category1' - yes matches
'myCategory' - yes matches
'Hello World!!!' - yes matches
'notset' - yes matches
'' - no
'not set' - no
'Not Set' - no
'NOT SET' - no
'<script>' - no

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Didn't work for me. –  Bob Oct 18 '11 at 18:52
    
I tried online regular expression testers like regexpal.com and regular-expressions.info/javascriptexample.html, it did not work. –  Bob Oct 19 '11 at 17:22
    
Let me try it in my actual application, maybe these online testers are not build for case sensitivity. I'll let you know. –  Bob Oct 19 '11 at 17:30
    
I plugged this into my validator and it works. However, I am using unobtrusive client side validation and I find that any regular expression with ?i: causes the client side validation to disable and use the server side validation instead. I no longer get the error message when tabbing off the input box, only when I post back to the server. Weird behaviour! –  Bob Oct 19 '11 at 20:18
    
I ended up using ^(?![nN][oO][tT] [sS][eE][tT]$)[a-zA-Z0-9.?!%, ]+$. This did not disable my client side validation. –  Bob Oct 19 '11 at 21:31
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up using

^(?![nN][oO][tT] [sS][eE][tT]$)[a-zA-Z0-9.?!%, ]+$

When using (?i:) in my .net validators and unobtrusive javascript I noticed my client side validation was getting disabled.

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