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I'm running into an issue where I have multiple threads that write to the same PrintWriter and not all the data is getting written to the file. I know the multi-threaded part is working correctly since I can print everything to the console. Synchronizing the write statements does not seem to be working. What could be the problem?

ExecutorService pool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(poolSize);

for (Integer i : map.keySet()) {
    final Collection<String[]> set = map.get(i);
    pool.submit(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
        StringBuffer sb = Matcher.performCollectionMatch(params);
        synchronized (this) {
            resultFile.print(sb); //this is a PrintWriter - it does NOT capture all sb
            resultFile.flush();
            System.out.print(sb); //this actually prints out ALL sb
        }
        }
    });
} //FOR loop
share|improve this question
    
is your pool size big enough? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 14 '11 at 22:37
    
I assume it is. I set it to 10 threads, and have not run out of memory. Also, I know the threads are doing the work correctly, since I can capture the output from System.out and it is accurate. –  banncee Oct 14 '11 at 22:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Do you close the PrintWriter after the pool stops?

pool.shutdown();
final boolean terminated = pool.awaitTermination(8, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
if (!terminated) {
    throw new IllegalStateException("pool shutdown timeout");
}

resultFile.close();
share|improve this answer
    
What I didn't realize was that pool.shutdown() does not block until all threads are complete. Simple fix: ` pool.shutdown(); while (!pool.isTerminated) { } resultFile.close(); ` –  banncee Oct 18 '11 at 14:08
2  
This while use a lot of CPU. awaitTermination does the same but use 0% CPU. –  palacsint Oct 18 '11 at 14:48
1  
Thanks for the tip. Will modify accordingly. –  banncee Oct 19 '11 at 14:45

For synchronization to work, you should use the same object for all threads, e.g.:

...
synchronized (resultFile) {
...
share|improve this answer
    
Initially that is exactly what I tried (my understanding of synchronized statements). However, it wrote even fewer results to the file. –  banncee Oct 14 '11 at 22:21
1  
Something else is quite wrong then. This answer correctly fixes the synchronization here, which was not actually protecting access to the stream. –  Sean Owen Oct 15 '11 at 9:17

A simpler solution is to ensure there is only one thread in the pool. This way you don't need to synchonize writing as there is only one thread.

ExecutorService pool = Executors.newSingleThreadedPool();

for (Integer i : map.keySet()) {
    final Collection<String[]> set = map.get(i);
    pool.executor(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            StringBuilder sb = Matcher.performCollectionMatch(params);
            resultFile.print(sb); //this is a PrintWriter - it does NOT capture all sb 
            System.out.print(sb); //this actually prints out ALL sb
        }
    });
} //FOR loop

It is quite likely the bottle neck is you disk access so adding more threads may not help.

share|improve this answer
    
But that defeats the purpose of multithreading :-) –  Konrad Höffner Jun 12 '13 at 12:27
    
@kirdie IMHO the purpose of multi-threading is to maximise performance, not use all the cores I have. Often the optimal number of threads is one. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jun 12 '13 at 14:18

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